Title

The Type 6 Secretion System and Its Impact on Gut Bacteria Survival

Author(s)

Juhwan ChoFollow

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Abstract

By exploring the properties of bacteria within the guts of leeches, we can understand and infer the properties of similar human gut bacteria. For example, the Type VI Secretion System found in certain types of bacteria has a significant effect on the competition between cells in the gut microbiome. A species such as Aeromonas veronii with genes that code for a T6SS, a protein nanoweapon capable of injecting toxins into other cells, will be more likely to survive in an gut microbiome than a species without. To see the effects of this bioweapon in action, we extracted Aeromonas samples from the stomachs of leeches and sequenced their genomes. The sequenced genomes showed that if the genes that code for a T6SS are present, then biochemical tests in the form of killing and motility assays can be performed to see if the protein secretion system truly had an effect on a species’ survival in its environment. The effects of this killing mechanism could possibly have medical applications as a form of antibiotic.

Location

Founders Hall 213 B

Start Date

3-30-2019 11:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 11:15 AM

The Type 6 Secretion System and Its Impact on Gut Bacteria Survival

Founders Hall 213 B

By exploring the properties of bacteria within the guts of leeches, we can understand and infer the properties of similar human gut bacteria. For example, the Type VI Secretion System found in certain types of bacteria has a significant effect on the competition between cells in the gut microbiome. A species such as Aeromonas veronii with genes that code for a T6SS, a protein nanoweapon capable of injecting toxins into other cells, will be more likely to survive in an gut microbiome than a species without. To see the effects of this bioweapon in action, we extracted Aeromonas samples from the stomachs of leeches and sequenced their genomes. The sequenced genomes showed that if the genes that code for a T6SS are present, then biochemical tests in the form of killing and motility assays can be performed to see if the protein secretion system truly had an effect on a species’ survival in its environment. The effects of this killing mechanism could possibly have medical applications as a form of antibiotic.