Title

TiO2 Nanostructures Obtained by Anodization for Biomedical Applications

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Abstract

Titanium and titanium alloy materials are commonly used in dental, orthopedic and craniofacial surgery. The primary reason that TI is widely used is its biocompatibility such as corrosion resistance and ability to withstand the harsh conditions within the human body. This study investigated the effects of anodization duration and voltage on the geometry of vertically oriented titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs). In addition, the growth mechanism of vertically aligned TiO2 NTs was examined. The NTs were primarily grown in fluoride-based electrolyte solution, however the mechanism of formation of NTs in fluoride free solution as well as the effect of electrolyte pH on NT geometry was also be investigated. These TiO2 NTs have potential biomedical applications for orthopedic implants and drug delivery due to their semi-conductive nature, osseointegration, and antibacterial properties. Characterization of the TiO2 NTs was performed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDX).

Location

Founders Hall 250 B

Start Date

3-30-2019 10:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

Yes

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 10:45 AM

TiO2 Nanostructures Obtained by Anodization for Biomedical Applications

Founders Hall 250 B

Titanium and titanium alloy materials are commonly used in dental, orthopedic and craniofacial surgery. The primary reason that TI is widely used is its biocompatibility such as corrosion resistance and ability to withstand the harsh conditions within the human body. This study investigated the effects of anodization duration and voltage on the geometry of vertically oriented titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs). In addition, the growth mechanism of vertically aligned TiO2 NTs was examined. The NTs were primarily grown in fluoride-based electrolyte solution, however the mechanism of formation of NTs in fluoride free solution as well as the effect of electrolyte pH on NT geometry was also be investigated. These TiO2 NTs have potential biomedical applications for orthopedic implants and drug delivery due to their semi-conductive nature, osseointegration, and antibacterial properties. Characterization of the TiO2 NTs was performed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDX).