Title

Age-Related Changes in Myelination of the Mouse Auditory Nerve

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

My research was to determine whether there was a correlation between myelination of the mouse auditory nerve and the age of the mouse. To do this, the myelin thickness, axon diameter, and g ratio (the ratio of the axon diameter with and without myelin) of axons in the auditory nerve of young and aged mice were measured. To find these measurements, the cochlea of mice from control groups in previous experiments were photographed under an electron microscope, and then these photographs were analyzed using an Image J plugin called G ratio. The results of this study indicate that the aged mice have more myelinated axons in their auditory nerve than young mice. Although, the current sample size is low. These results imply that demyelination is not the cause of presbycusis. They also provide several new questions to explore: What causes the increase in myelination, and what are the effects of this increase?

Location

Founders Hall 142 A

Start Date

3-30-2019 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 9:45 AM

Age-Related Changes in Myelination of the Mouse Auditory Nerve

Founders Hall 142 A

My research was to determine whether there was a correlation between myelination of the mouse auditory nerve and the age of the mouse. To do this, the myelin thickness, axon diameter, and g ratio (the ratio of the axon diameter with and without myelin) of axons in the auditory nerve of young and aged mice were measured. To find these measurements, the cochlea of mice from control groups in previous experiments were photographed under an electron microscope, and then these photographs were analyzed using an Image J plugin called G ratio. The results of this study indicate that the aged mice have more myelinated axons in their auditory nerve than young mice. Although, the current sample size is low. These results imply that demyelination is not the cause of presbycusis. They also provide several new questions to explore: What causes the increase in myelination, and what are the effects of this increase?