Title

An Analysis on the Potential Effect of Climatic Conditions on Corn and Peanut Production In the Coastal Regions of South Carolina

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Climate change is a change in global or regional climate patterns. The increased levels of atmospheric CO2 produced by the excess burning of fossil fuels and the ensuing greenhouse effect contribute to this. Agricultural productions are heavily altered by changes in climate as crops are dependent on climatic conditions to germinate and grow. The agricultural sector, helps sustain life and accounts for about 9% of SC’s economy (SCDA, n.d.). Thus it is important to understand the relationship between climatic factors and agricultural production. Experimentation began by collecting data from the USDA: NASS, US Climate Data, and the NOAA: NCEI. The data was then categorized and analyzed through a Pearson correlation, a numerical representation of the explored relationship. An ANOVA was added to significant relationships to ensure a difference in climate or crop outcome. The hypothesis was that if temperature and total liquid content are tested for a correlation to the changes in corn and peanut production over the span of 4 years in the coastal regions of SC, then the coastal zone would contain the highest correlation for temperature and corn. At α=0.05 the hypothesis was not supported. The outer coastal plain held a significant relationship for the lb/ac of peanuts to the TLC and temperature with p=0.022 and 0.013, respectively. County wise Colleton, Bamberg, Horry, and Dorchester held at least one significant relationship. This means that the crops were adversely affected by increased precipitation at the local scale, except for Dorchester county.

Location

Founders Hall 213 C

Start Date

3-30-2019 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 9:45 AM

An Analysis on the Potential Effect of Climatic Conditions on Corn and Peanut Production In the Coastal Regions of South Carolina

Founders Hall 213 C

Climate change is a change in global or regional climate patterns. The increased levels of atmospheric CO2 produced by the excess burning of fossil fuels and the ensuing greenhouse effect contribute to this. Agricultural productions are heavily altered by changes in climate as crops are dependent on climatic conditions to germinate and grow. The agricultural sector, helps sustain life and accounts for about 9% of SC’s economy (SCDA, n.d.). Thus it is important to understand the relationship between climatic factors and agricultural production. Experimentation began by collecting data from the USDA: NASS, US Climate Data, and the NOAA: NCEI. The data was then categorized and analyzed through a Pearson correlation, a numerical representation of the explored relationship. An ANOVA was added to significant relationships to ensure a difference in climate or crop outcome. The hypothesis was that if temperature and total liquid content are tested for a correlation to the changes in corn and peanut production over the span of 4 years in the coastal regions of SC, then the coastal zone would contain the highest correlation for temperature and corn. At α=0.05 the hypothesis was not supported. The outer coastal plain held a significant relationship for the lb/ac of peanuts to the TLC and temperature with p=0.022 and 0.013, respectively. County wise Colleton, Bamberg, Horry, and Dorchester held at least one significant relationship. This means that the crops were adversely affected by increased precipitation at the local scale, except for Dorchester county.