Title

CD8+ T-Cells Have A Biphasic Role During Post-Myocardial Infarction Cardiac Remodeling

Author(s)

Reed StuderFollow

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

In the past, people did not believe that adaptive immunity was a major component of the post-myocardial infarction wound healing process. This was because the cells that are involved in the process of adaptive immunity were found in such small amounts around the infarct region. Recent studies have shown that when people have increased levels of these CD8+ T-cells, there is a decrease in survival rates post-myocardial infarction. It is not completely known why these elevated levels lead to such an impairment of the healing process. My goal for this summer is to access the inflammatory component of the wound healing process by performing immunohistochemistry. I will also analyze echocardiography data which will indicate changes in cardiac function after heart attack. We hypothesized that CD8+ T-cells control the inflammation that occurs, and this leads to the decrease in both survival rates and cardiac function. To test this, the left anterior descending coronary artery is closed to simulate the lack of blood flow during a heart attack. Two different kinds of mice were used: the C57Bl6/J (WT) mice and a mutant that does not express the CD8+ on the surface of the inflammatory T-cells. Staining for the white blood cells, neutrophils and macrophages, were performed to assess changes in inflammation when CD8+ T-cells are not present. Echocardiography which evaluates the pumping action of the heart was also performed to assess differences in cardiac function between mouse strains.

Location

Founders Hall 142 A

Start Date

3-30-2019 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 9:30 AM

CD8+ T-Cells Have A Biphasic Role During Post-Myocardial Infarction Cardiac Remodeling

Founders Hall 142 A

In the past, people did not believe that adaptive immunity was a major component of the post-myocardial infarction wound healing process. This was because the cells that are involved in the process of adaptive immunity were found in such small amounts around the infarct region. Recent studies have shown that when people have increased levels of these CD8+ T-cells, there is a decrease in survival rates post-myocardial infarction. It is not completely known why these elevated levels lead to such an impairment of the healing process. My goal for this summer is to access the inflammatory component of the wound healing process by performing immunohistochemistry. I will also analyze echocardiography data which will indicate changes in cardiac function after heart attack. We hypothesized that CD8+ T-cells control the inflammation that occurs, and this leads to the decrease in both survival rates and cardiac function. To test this, the left anterior descending coronary artery is closed to simulate the lack of blood flow during a heart attack. Two different kinds of mice were used: the C57Bl6/J (WT) mice and a mutant that does not express the CD8+ on the surface of the inflammatory T-cells. Staining for the white blood cells, neutrophils and macrophages, were performed to assess changes in inflammation when CD8+ T-cells are not present. Echocardiography which evaluates the pumping action of the heart was also performed to assess differences in cardiac function between mouse strains.