Title

Characterization of Gold Nanoparticle Encapsulated Polymersomes for Brain Imaging

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Presently, the method for Computer Tomography (CT) scanning is ingesting radioactive heavy metals that are visible on these scans. CT scanning is used to image different parts of the body with contrast dyes, including the brain. This project uses biocompatible polymersomes to carry gold nanoparticles to the brain. The intention is to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with the gold nanoparticle-encapsulated polymersomes. Polymersomes are self-assembled amphipathic nanoparticles that can be used as a vesicle to encapsulate other nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles. To create the polymersomes, a synthetic polymer, polyethylene glycol-b-polylactic acid (PEG-PLA) was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and injected into 2% D-mannitol solution. The polymersome sizes were determined to be 176.6 ± 10.1 nm using dynamic light scattering. To complete the process, the polymersomes are slowly frozen at -20℃ and -80℃ and lyophilized between 15-18 hours. The polymersomes had a 17.7% encapsulation efficiency with the Near Infrared dye (NIR), which was verified using Ultraviolet-Visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy. The gold nanoparticles were loaded into the polymersomes using the NIR dye loading procedure. Then the absorption of the gold nanoparticle-loaded polymersomes was measured at a wavelength of 515-525 nm, yielding an encapsulation efficiency of approximately 72.5%. After encapsulation, the polymersomes are guided to the brain once injected into the body. Upon reaching the brain, the gold nanoparticles can serve as targeting ligands or contrast agents. In the future, procedures for encapsulating other metallic nanoparticles can be carried out to be more easily read by CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans.

Location

Founders Hall 250 B

Start Date

3-30-2019 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

Yes

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 9:30 AM

Characterization of Gold Nanoparticle Encapsulated Polymersomes for Brain Imaging

Founders Hall 250 B

Presently, the method for Computer Tomography (CT) scanning is ingesting radioactive heavy metals that are visible on these scans. CT scanning is used to image different parts of the body with contrast dyes, including the brain. This project uses biocompatible polymersomes to carry gold nanoparticles to the brain. The intention is to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with the gold nanoparticle-encapsulated polymersomes. Polymersomes are self-assembled amphipathic nanoparticles that can be used as a vesicle to encapsulate other nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles. To create the polymersomes, a synthetic polymer, polyethylene glycol-b-polylactic acid (PEG-PLA) was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and injected into 2% D-mannitol solution. The polymersome sizes were determined to be 176.6 ± 10.1 nm using dynamic light scattering. To complete the process, the polymersomes are slowly frozen at -20℃ and -80℃ and lyophilized between 15-18 hours. The polymersomes had a 17.7% encapsulation efficiency with the Near Infrared dye (NIR), which was verified using Ultraviolet-Visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy. The gold nanoparticles were loaded into the polymersomes using the NIR dye loading procedure. Then the absorption of the gold nanoparticle-loaded polymersomes was measured at a wavelength of 515-525 nm, yielding an encapsulation efficiency of approximately 72.5%. After encapsulation, the polymersomes are guided to the brain once injected into the body. Upon reaching the brain, the gold nanoparticles can serve as targeting ligands or contrast agents. In the future, procedures for encapsulating other metallic nanoparticles can be carried out to be more easily read by CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans.