Title

Cloning of Candidate Genes from Seashore Paspallum

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Cell and Molecular Biology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Drought and salt stresses have a negative impact on agricultural production. There is promising research on the molecular mechanisms of plant tolerance to drought and salt exposure in model species. For example, Uddin et al. (2012) reported using a non-model plant species with a high tolerance to both stresses. In this study, five seashore paspallum genes (m11, m23, m26, m28 and m31) were chosen that were responsive to salt and drought conditions. The full-length seashore paspallum cDNA was cloned to evaluate the genes’ effectiveness in the model species Arabidopsis. This gene could then be transferred into economically important crops via Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation for future analysis. Five and three prime ends of the candidate genes were cloned and sequenced using RACE PCR, and the cDNAs were cloned from these sequences. In the future, the genes will be delivered into Agrobacterium via electroporation and transformed into Arabidopsis using floral dip approach. The transgenic plants will be tested to see if the overexpression of the candidate genes will positively impact the plant’s response to abiotic and biotic stresses such as drought and salt.

Location

Founders Hall 114 A

Start Date

3-30-2019 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 9:30 AM

Cloning of Candidate Genes from Seashore Paspallum

Founders Hall 114 A

Drought and salt stresses have a negative impact on agricultural production. There is promising research on the molecular mechanisms of plant tolerance to drought and salt exposure in model species. For example, Uddin et al. (2012) reported using a non-model plant species with a high tolerance to both stresses. In this study, five seashore paspallum genes (m11, m23, m26, m28 and m31) were chosen that were responsive to salt and drought conditions. The full-length seashore paspallum cDNA was cloned to evaluate the genes’ effectiveness in the model species Arabidopsis. This gene could then be transferred into economically important crops via Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation for future analysis. Five and three prime ends of the candidate genes were cloned and sequenced using RACE PCR, and the cDNAs were cloned from these sequences. In the future, the genes will be delivered into Agrobacterium via electroporation and transformed into Arabidopsis using floral dip approach. The transgenic plants will be tested to see if the overexpression of the candidate genes will positively impact the plant’s response to abiotic and biotic stresses such as drought and salt.