Title

Exploring the Role of Circulating MIR-134 In Breast Cancer Recurrence

Author(s)

Lauren ChenFollow

School Name

Dutch Fork High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Cell and Molecular Biology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short sequences of RNA (about 22 nucleotides) that are involved in the regulation of gene expression. My previous study has identified the serum miR-134 as a new biomarkers to predict breast cancer recurrence after primary treatment. To further study the function of miR-134 in breast cancer progression, I transfected miR-134 into breast cancer and macrophage cells. I found that overexpression of miR-134 had no effect on tumor cell proliferation but induced macrophage phenotypic changes. Interestingly, the conditioned medium from miR-134 overexpressed macrophage cells promoted the growth of tumor cells. My results suggested that circulating miR-134 may promote tumor progression and recurrence by potentially mediating the interaction between tumor cells and immune cells.

Location

Founders Hall 114 A

Start Date

3-30-2019 2:00 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 2:00 PM

Exploring the Role of Circulating MIR-134 In Breast Cancer Recurrence

Founders Hall 114 A

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short sequences of RNA (about 22 nucleotides) that are involved in the regulation of gene expression. My previous study has identified the serum miR-134 as a new biomarkers to predict breast cancer recurrence after primary treatment. To further study the function of miR-134 in breast cancer progression, I transfected miR-134 into breast cancer and macrophage cells. I found that overexpression of miR-134 had no effect on tumor cell proliferation but induced macrophage phenotypic changes. Interestingly, the conditioned medium from miR-134 overexpressed macrophage cells promoted the growth of tumor cells. My results suggested that circulating miR-134 may promote tumor progression and recurrence by potentially mediating the interaction between tumor cells and immune cells.