Title

How a History of Lupus Nephritis Affects Pregnancy Outcomes

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Lupus Nephritis (LN) is an autoimmune disease caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). LN is most common in females betweenpuberty and menopause.It is important for healthcare providers to understand how LN affects a pregnancy's outcome. An observational study was performed along with a nested case-control study within a longitudinal registry of SLE patients in which cases were SLE females with adverse pregnancy outcome(s). Controls were SLE females who were exposed to LN with a full-term pregnancy and a healthy baby. Patients enrolled in the registry provided signed informed consent to have clinical data utilized for research. In person interviews and chart reviews were performed to confirm demographics, medical history, and social history. We found that women with SLE were less likely to have a live birth if they had any history of LN (odds ratio 0.65) when adjusted for age and SLE disease duration (p=0.09). We also found that females with SLE were more likely to have a low birthweight baby if they had any history of LN (odds ratio 1.60) when adjusted for age and SLE disease duration (p=0.07). Although the increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes in females with LN is not very large, this study highlights the importance of preconception counseling to point out the potential risks for both the mother and fetus. Additionally, the work done here stresses the need for pregnant females with LN to seek advice and care from a high-risk OB specialist to improve chances of a positive pregnancy outcome.

Location

Furman Hall 201

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:00 AM

How a History of Lupus Nephritis Affects Pregnancy Outcomes

Furman Hall 201

Lupus Nephritis (LN) is an autoimmune disease caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). LN is most common in females betweenpuberty and menopause.It is important for healthcare providers to understand how LN affects a pregnancy's outcome. An observational study was performed along with a nested case-control study within a longitudinal registry of SLE patients in which cases were SLE females with adverse pregnancy outcome(s). Controls were SLE females who were exposed to LN with a full-term pregnancy and a healthy baby. Patients enrolled in the registry provided signed informed consent to have clinical data utilized for research. In person interviews and chart reviews were performed to confirm demographics, medical history, and social history. We found that women with SLE were less likely to have a live birth if they had any history of LN (odds ratio 0.65) when adjusted for age and SLE disease duration (p=0.09). We also found that females with SLE were more likely to have a low birthweight baby if they had any history of LN (odds ratio 1.60) when adjusted for age and SLE disease duration (p=0.07). Although the increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes in females with LN is not very large, this study highlights the importance of preconception counseling to point out the potential risks for both the mother and fetus. Additionally, the work done here stresses the need for pregnant females with LN to seek advice and care from a high-risk OB specialist to improve chances of a positive pregnancy outcome.