Title

CD8+ T-Cells Regulate Innate Immunity Decreasing Survival Post-Mi

Author(s)

Mai CameronFollow

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Cell and Molecular Biology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Myocardial infarction (MI) is the most prevalent cause of death in the United States, indicating that the study of more effective post-MI treatment remains pertinent. In a recent study by DeLeon-Pennell et al., it was determined that CD8+ T-cells regulate innate immune response, thereby increasing 7-day survival rates post-MI. The main objective of this study was to further explore how the post-MI environment would regulate CD8+ T-cell physiology. The T-cells were cultured in 0.10% FBS (unstimulated), IL4, IL12, IL4+MMP9, and IL12+MMP9 for 4 hours, and conditioned media were collected and analyzed using a mass spectrometer. Clustering of the dataset using Pearson's coefficient and Markov's Clustering algorithm showed five main clusters corresponding to the five main groups. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and volcano plot was created to determine proteins of statistical significance in the 4-hour treatment. Actin, antithrombin-III, amyloid-beta A4, collagen alpha-5(IV) chain, exocyst complex component 4, and GMP reductase 2 were among a few statistically significant proteins in the 4-hour treatment as determined by ANOVA. Additionally, we found that certain protein secretions were correlated by gender. In conclusion, our study suggests that the post-MI environment is facilitating in CD8+ T-cell function and thus facilitating the post-MI wound healing progression.

Location

Furman Hall 107

Start Date

3-28-2020 8:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 8:45 AM

CD8+ T-Cells Regulate Innate Immunity Decreasing Survival Post-Mi

Furman Hall 107

Myocardial infarction (MI) is the most prevalent cause of death in the United States, indicating that the study of more effective post-MI treatment remains pertinent. In a recent study by DeLeon-Pennell et al., it was determined that CD8+ T-cells regulate innate immune response, thereby increasing 7-day survival rates post-MI. The main objective of this study was to further explore how the post-MI environment would regulate CD8+ T-cell physiology. The T-cells were cultured in 0.10% FBS (unstimulated), IL4, IL12, IL4+MMP9, and IL12+MMP9 for 4 hours, and conditioned media were collected and analyzed using a mass spectrometer. Clustering of the dataset using Pearson's coefficient and Markov's Clustering algorithm showed five main clusters corresponding to the five main groups. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and volcano plot was created to determine proteins of statistical significance in the 4-hour treatment. Actin, antithrombin-III, amyloid-beta A4, collagen alpha-5(IV) chain, exocyst complex component 4, and GMP reductase 2 were among a few statistically significant proteins in the 4-hour treatment as determined by ANOVA. Additionally, we found that certain protein secretions were correlated by gender. In conclusion, our study suggests that the post-MI environment is facilitating in CD8+ T-cell function and thus facilitating the post-MI wound healing progression.