Title

Neuroinflammation In Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseased Mice

Author(s)

Megan ParhamFollow

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Non-Alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the term used to describe excessive fat build-up in the liver and can lead to liver damage. It currently affects about one-third of the world's population and 30% of United States citizens. Previous studies have shown that NAFLD induces signs of Alzheimer's disease, indicating that there is a link between NAFLD and neuroinflammation. Our objective is to identify that link and study the role of inflammasomes in NAFLD mediated neuroinflammation. To do this, we fed mice a Methionine-Choline deficient (MCD) diet and ran several gene expression studies using Real-Time PCR targeting Interleukin 6, 18, 1β , Caspase 1, and Matrix Metallopeptidase P9. We then ran an immunofluorescent study targeting ASC2, CASP1, and NLRP3. Finally, we conducted a Western Blot Experiment. Our results showed significantly elevated levels of IL6, IL18, CASP1, MMP9, and IL 1β within MCD-diet mice compared to chow-fed mice. Within the frontal cortex of MCD-diet mice, ASC2, CASP1, and NLRP3 have higher levels of colocalization, meaning more inflammasomes are being activated within the MCD-diet tissues than the chow-diet tissues. Finally, the western blot showed a much higher concentration of High Mobility Box 1 protein (HMGB1) within the MCD-diet samples compared to the chow diet, meaning HMGB1 could be the Damage Associated Molecular Pattern (DAMP) that links NAFLD to neuroinflammation. However, there is not enough solid evidence to provide a definite conclusion and studies are still ongoing.

Location

Furman Hall 201

Start Date

3-28-2020 11:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 11:45 AM

Neuroinflammation In Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseased Mice

Furman Hall 201

Non-Alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the term used to describe excessive fat build-up in the liver and can lead to liver damage. It currently affects about one-third of the world's population and 30% of United States citizens. Previous studies have shown that NAFLD induces signs of Alzheimer's disease, indicating that there is a link between NAFLD and neuroinflammation. Our objective is to identify that link and study the role of inflammasomes in NAFLD mediated neuroinflammation. To do this, we fed mice a Methionine-Choline deficient (MCD) diet and ran several gene expression studies using Real-Time PCR targeting Interleukin 6, 18, 1β , Caspase 1, and Matrix Metallopeptidase P9. We then ran an immunofluorescent study targeting ASC2, CASP1, and NLRP3. Finally, we conducted a Western Blot Experiment. Our results showed significantly elevated levels of IL6, IL18, CASP1, MMP9, and IL 1β within MCD-diet mice compared to chow-fed mice. Within the frontal cortex of MCD-diet mice, ASC2, CASP1, and NLRP3 have higher levels of colocalization, meaning more inflammasomes are being activated within the MCD-diet tissues than the chow-diet tissues. Finally, the western blot showed a much higher concentration of High Mobility Box 1 protein (HMGB1) within the MCD-diet samples compared to the chow diet, meaning HMGB1 could be the Damage Associated Molecular Pattern (DAMP) that links NAFLD to neuroinflammation. However, there is not enough solid evidence to provide a definite conclusion and studies are still ongoing.