Title

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Sound-Based Repellents on Aedes aegypti

Author(s)

Andrew Juhn

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Of the many disease-carrying vectors that exist, mosquitoes are one of the most problematic and deadly. Aedes aegypti, more commonly known as the yellow fever mosquito, is a vector for diseases such as Zika, Yellow Fever, and Dengue Fever. Repellents to prevent bites and contact exist, but some, including sound-based repellents, are dubiously effective. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effectiveness of sound-based repellents at repelling Aedes aegypti and to examine a commercially sold repellent's functionality. It was hypothesized that the commercial repellent would be the most effective, followed by the 10,000 hertz tone and the 400 hertz tone. A mosquito was placed into an experimental chamber, in which a sound would be played for 10 minutes, and observations would be made following that span of time. A One-Way ANOVA was performed, and it was found that there was a significant difference between no sound being played and a sound being played, with the commercial repellent being the least effective and the 10,000 hertz tone being the most effective. This meant the hypothesis was partially supported, as there was a significant repellency, but the commercial repellent was not the most effective. In the future, a continuation could focus on repellents being applied in a more 3-dimensional space as opposed to a tube.

Location

Furman Hall 119

Start Date

3-28-2020 10:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 10:45 AM

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Sound-Based Repellents on Aedes aegypti

Furman Hall 119

Of the many disease-carrying vectors that exist, mosquitoes are one of the most problematic and deadly. Aedes aegypti, more commonly known as the yellow fever mosquito, is a vector for diseases such as Zika, Yellow Fever, and Dengue Fever. Repellents to prevent bites and contact exist, but some, including sound-based repellents, are dubiously effective. The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effectiveness of sound-based repellents at repelling Aedes aegypti and to examine a commercially sold repellent's functionality. It was hypothesized that the commercial repellent would be the most effective, followed by the 10,000 hertz tone and the 400 hertz tone. A mosquito was placed into an experimental chamber, in which a sound would be played for 10 minutes, and observations would be made following that span of time. A One-Way ANOVA was performed, and it was found that there was a significant difference between no sound being played and a sound being played, with the commercial repellent being the least effective and the 10,000 hertz tone being the most effective. This meant the hypothesis was partially supported, as there was a significant repellency, but the commercial repellent was not the most effective. In the future, a continuation could focus on repellents being applied in a more 3-dimensional space as opposed to a tube.