Title

The Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration on the Run Time of a Hydrogen Fuel Cell

Author(s)

Caroline Tinch

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Pollution is a worldwide problem that poses serious risks to the environment, as well as human health. To limit air pollution, researchers and lawmakers are working to create cars powered by renewable energy as an environmentally-friendly alternative to conventional gasoline powered vehicles. Hydrogen fuel cell cars rely on a chemical reaction called electrolysis to convert hydrogen to usable electric power. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration on the output of the fuel cell. This experiment used a Horizon Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car Science Kit to test three different concentrations of H2O2, and output was measured using the run time of the car. It was hypothesized that hydrogen peroxide with a higher concentration would produce a higher output of the fuel cell, and therefore a longer run time for the car. The results of this experiment showed measurable increases in the average run time of the car that corresponded to increases in H2O2 concentration. However, a single factor ANOVA test was run, and the data were shown to be insignificant, supporting the null hypothesis. After careful consideration, outliers were removed from the data. A single factor ANOVA was run on the remaining data, and the results were shown to be significant, supporting the hypothesis.

Location

Furman Hall 227

Start Date

3-28-2020 12:00 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 12:00 PM

The Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration on the Run Time of a Hydrogen Fuel Cell

Furman Hall 227

Pollution is a worldwide problem that poses serious risks to the environment, as well as human health. To limit air pollution, researchers and lawmakers are working to create cars powered by renewable energy as an environmentally-friendly alternative to conventional gasoline powered vehicles. Hydrogen fuel cell cars rely on a chemical reaction called electrolysis to convert hydrogen to usable electric power. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration on the output of the fuel cell. This experiment used a Horizon Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car Science Kit to test three different concentrations of H2O2, and output was measured using the run time of the car. It was hypothesized that hydrogen peroxide with a higher concentration would produce a higher output of the fuel cell, and therefore a longer run time for the car. The results of this experiment showed measurable increases in the average run time of the car that corresponded to increases in H2O2 concentration. However, a single factor ANOVA test was run, and the data were shown to be insignificant, supporting the null hypothesis. After careful consideration, outliers were removed from the data. A single factor ANOVA was run on the remaining data, and the results were shown to be significant, supporting the hypothesis.