Title

Quantifying the Effects on the Dispersion of Microparticles and Bacteria Due to Walking Robots

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Poor air quality has been linked to respiratory and cardiac issues. Research regarding indoor air quality commonly focuses on microbial biodiversity, but this study's purpose was to evaluate the ability of microparticles to transfer between surfaces and become airborne. By researching particle transfer and resuspension, flooring can be improved to prevent air quality deterioration. First, two Lego Mindstorms robots, a basic NXT and an EV3STORM, were constructed. A 70-centimeter by 45-centimeter cardboard was marked into a 5-centimeter by 5-centimeter grid. Each wheel, tread, weighing boat, and baby powder was massed. The powder was sprinkled on the board, which was shaken to achieve uniformity. Then, a robot rolled through the powder; the wheels or tread were placed in a weighing boat and massed to find the amount of powder collected. Finally, the test was repeated with the other robot. Depending on the test, speed or surface density was manipulated. For the organic tests, a phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and Corynebacterium mixture was sprayed using a Collison nebulizer at 0.51 atmospheres for 90 seconds in a large container. The particles were allowed five minutes to deposit; then, the EV3STORM robot made 6 rolls over the deposited particles. The treads were removed and soaked in 100 milliliters of PBS for five minutes. Finally, a sample was analyzed by a Beckham Coulter Counter to find the particle count. The data suggests that particle behavior via intermolecular forces exerts greater influence on particle transfer than the amount of powder.

Location

Furman Hall 126

Start Date

3-28-2020 11:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 11:30 AM

Quantifying the Effects on the Dispersion of Microparticles and Bacteria Due to Walking Robots

Furman Hall 126

Poor air quality has been linked to respiratory and cardiac issues. Research regarding indoor air quality commonly focuses on microbial biodiversity, but this study's purpose was to evaluate the ability of microparticles to transfer between surfaces and become airborne. By researching particle transfer and resuspension, flooring can be improved to prevent air quality deterioration. First, two Lego Mindstorms robots, a basic NXT and an EV3STORM, were constructed. A 70-centimeter by 45-centimeter cardboard was marked into a 5-centimeter by 5-centimeter grid. Each wheel, tread, weighing boat, and baby powder was massed. The powder was sprinkled on the board, which was shaken to achieve uniformity. Then, a robot rolled through the powder; the wheels or tread were placed in a weighing boat and massed to find the amount of powder collected. Finally, the test was repeated with the other robot. Depending on the test, speed or surface density was manipulated. For the organic tests, a phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and Corynebacterium mixture was sprayed using a Collison nebulizer at 0.51 atmospheres for 90 seconds in a large container. The particles were allowed five minutes to deposit; then, the EV3STORM robot made 6 rolls over the deposited particles. The treads were removed and soaked in 100 milliliters of PBS for five minutes. Finally, a sample was analyzed by a Beckham Coulter Counter to find the particle count. The data suggests that particle behavior via intermolecular forces exerts greater influence on particle transfer than the amount of powder.