Title

The Effect of Different Sandbag Fillings on .30-06 Penetration Distance

Author(s)

John Tighe

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Sandbags play large roles in both civil and international crises. In civil work, they are utilized to prevent water damage and act as a deployable damn (Corps of Engineers 1999). In international crises, they are commonly used to provide cover for infantry. The purpose of this study was to test how sandbag fillings can alter the sandbag's ability to provide cover. The independent variable was the bullet fired and the Dependent variable was the material in the bag. The hypothesis for this study was if different bullets pass through different materials, then we expect to see varying results depending on the material shot. By filling gallon bags with different substances, dirt, sand, gravel, and peat-moss, and lining them up, and shooting it with a rifle, we could find where the bullet stopped and measure the distance penetrated. The final result is that sand and gravel performed the best while dirt performed badly and peat-moss was useless in terms of stopping a bullet. These results support the hypothesis.

Location

John's Hall 105

Start Date

3-28-2020 11:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 11:45 AM

The Effect of Different Sandbag Fillings on .30-06 Penetration Distance

John's Hall 105

Sandbags play large roles in both civil and international crises. In civil work, they are utilized to prevent water damage and act as a deployable damn (Corps of Engineers 1999). In international crises, they are commonly used to provide cover for infantry. The purpose of this study was to test how sandbag fillings can alter the sandbag's ability to provide cover. The independent variable was the bullet fired and the Dependent variable was the material in the bag. The hypothesis for this study was if different bullets pass through different materials, then we expect to see varying results depending on the material shot. By filling gallon bags with different substances, dirt, sand, gravel, and peat-moss, and lining them up, and shooting it with a rifle, we could find where the bullet stopped and measure the distance penetrated. The final result is that sand and gravel performed the best while dirt performed badly and peat-moss was useless in terms of stopping a bullet. These results support the hypothesis.