Title

The Effect of Water Pressure on It's Lift Force

Author(s)

Henry Scouten

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Scientists have proposed alternative ways of supporting buildings named active support structures, a process in which matter is propelled up and reflected off, as a means of creating thrust for the platform desired to be supported. This study examines the correlation of water pressure and the height in inches of a lightweight platform. The hypothesis of this experiment is that the water pressure will have a direct correlation with the hight the platform will rise. The null hypothesis of this experiment is that the water pressure will not have a direct correlation with the hight the platform will rise. Using the information gathered, placed in to a graph and analyzed with the graphing software, evidence was discovered to help support the hypothesis. However there are some statistical uncertainties, as the setup, and recording of the experiment was partially dependant on human involvement which may have limited the accuracy of the data The final analysis of the data provided does tend to support the hypothesis, as the data does introduce some significant evidence for it.

Location

John's Hall 107

Start Date

3-28-2020 11:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 11:45 AM

The Effect of Water Pressure on It's Lift Force

John's Hall 107

Scientists have proposed alternative ways of supporting buildings named active support structures, a process in which matter is propelled up and reflected off, as a means of creating thrust for the platform desired to be supported. This study examines the correlation of water pressure and the height in inches of a lightweight platform. The hypothesis of this experiment is that the water pressure will have a direct correlation with the hight the platform will rise. The null hypothesis of this experiment is that the water pressure will not have a direct correlation with the hight the platform will rise. Using the information gathered, placed in to a graph and analyzed with the graphing software, evidence was discovered to help support the hypothesis. However there are some statistical uncertainties, as the setup, and recording of the experiment was partially dependant on human involvement which may have limited the accuracy of the data The final analysis of the data provided does tend to support the hypothesis, as the data does introduce some significant evidence for it.