Title

Knee Replacement Patient Activity

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Sedentary behavior among adults after a knee replacement surgery is increasing across America. Over 4 million adults over the age of forty are living with a knee replacement surgery in the United States. With over 675,000 of that population having their surgery within the past year. As knee replacement surgery is becoming more common, so is sedentary behavior. The purpose of my research was to determine the amount of sedentary behavior exhibited post-surgery. We hypothesize that patients would be more active on the weekdays as compared to the weekends. For this investigation, we used Fitbits to track the number of steps taken each day by patients. Their quantitative results from fitabase were put into Excel and analyzed. The results given from the p-values indicated that there was not enough evidence to prove there was any significant difference between steps taken on the weekend as compared to during the weekdays and behavior levels remained almost identical to those prior to surgery. Future plans are to find more participants to take part in this study and to increase diversity. We will also investigate hip replacement, as well as patients who have torn their achilles tendon post surgery.

Location

Furman Hall 201

Start Date

3-28-2020 10:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 10:45 AM

Knee Replacement Patient Activity

Furman Hall 201

Sedentary behavior among adults after a knee replacement surgery is increasing across America. Over 4 million adults over the age of forty are living with a knee replacement surgery in the United States. With over 675,000 of that population having their surgery within the past year. As knee replacement surgery is becoming more common, so is sedentary behavior. The purpose of my research was to determine the amount of sedentary behavior exhibited post-surgery. We hypothesize that patients would be more active on the weekdays as compared to the weekends. For this investigation, we used Fitbits to track the number of steps taken each day by patients. Their quantitative results from fitabase were put into Excel and analyzed. The results given from the p-values indicated that there was not enough evidence to prove there was any significant difference between steps taken on the weekend as compared to during the weekdays and behavior levels remained almost identical to those prior to surgery. Future plans are to find more participants to take part in this study and to increase diversity. We will also investigate hip replacement, as well as patients who have torn their achilles tendon post surgery.