Title

The Effect of Silver Nanoparticles on the Heartbeat of Daphnia magna

Author(s)

Sreya Maddipati

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Silver nanoparticles are an antibacterial agent. Sometimes when these items are thrown away improperly they leak out into the environment and contaminate the lakes and ponds, and the creatures that live in them. In each container of items like lotions or toothpaste, there are shown to be approximately 90 to 130 milligrams of silver nanoparticles. If researchers can find out how much silver nanoparticles the Daphnia can tolerate, then they could help to reduce the amounts being used until they are at a safe quantity. It was hypothesized that as the Daphnia were introduced to increased amounts of silver nanoparticles, their heartbeats would increase as they would be in distress until they died. To test this theory, 5 different containers of spring water with 30-40 Daphnia magna were added to each container. The silver nanoparticles were left in the Daphnia containers overnight and the heartbeat was tested in the morning. The four IV containers were introduced to 90 mg, 100 mg, 115 mg, and 130 mg respectively. According to the ANOVA, the results were statistically significant: F(4,145) = 22.29. The mean and the median of each set of independent variables decreased as they went on. The means being an average of 175.53 BPM for the control, 139.70 BPM when introduced to 90 mg of silver nanoparticles, 130.93 BPM when introduced to 100mg of silver nanoparticles, 97.00 BPM for 115 mg, and 94.3 BPM for 130 mg of silver nanoparticles. This shows that as the Daphnia magna were introduced to a greater amount of silver nanoparticles, their heartbeats decreased as they got closer to death.

Location

Furman Hall 227

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:15 AM

The Effect of Silver Nanoparticles on the Heartbeat of Daphnia magna

Furman Hall 227

Silver nanoparticles are an antibacterial agent. Sometimes when these items are thrown away improperly they leak out into the environment and contaminate the lakes and ponds, and the creatures that live in them. In each container of items like lotions or toothpaste, there are shown to be approximately 90 to 130 milligrams of silver nanoparticles. If researchers can find out how much silver nanoparticles the Daphnia can tolerate, then they could help to reduce the amounts being used until they are at a safe quantity. It was hypothesized that as the Daphnia were introduced to increased amounts of silver nanoparticles, their heartbeats would increase as they would be in distress until they died. To test this theory, 5 different containers of spring water with 30-40 Daphnia magna were added to each container. The silver nanoparticles were left in the Daphnia containers overnight and the heartbeat was tested in the morning. The four IV containers were introduced to 90 mg, 100 mg, 115 mg, and 130 mg respectively. According to the ANOVA, the results were statistically significant: F(4,145) = 22.29. The mean and the median of each set of independent variables decreased as they went on. The means being an average of 175.53 BPM for the control, 139.70 BPM when introduced to 90 mg of silver nanoparticles, 130.93 BPM when introduced to 100mg of silver nanoparticles, 97.00 BPM for 115 mg, and 94.3 BPM for 130 mg of silver nanoparticles. This shows that as the Daphnia magna were introduced to a greater amount of silver nanoparticles, their heartbeats decreased as they got closer to death.