Title

The Effect of Phosphate Fertilizer on Heart Rate and Population of Daphnia magna

Author(s)

Aaliya Wiggs

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The amount of eutrophication occurring as a result of chemical water pollution is rapidly increasing in numerous aquatic environments. Although a balance of Nitrogen - Phosphorus - Potassium (NPK) is necessary to sustain necessary biological and ecological processes, excessive use of fertilizers has led to increased algal growth and disruption of aquatic ecosystems. To determine whether the introduction of phosphate-based fertilizer into an aquatic ecosystem could pose a potential threat to such habitants, this research examined the effect of phosphate fertilizer on Daphnia magna heart rate and mortality after exposure. Daphnia magna were placed in solutions of phosphate fertilizer at varying concentrations over a span of three days and their heart rate was collected prior to and after exposure to the fertilizer. It was hypothesized that increases in concentration would cause D. magna to have elevated heart rates due to the strain the environmental change would have on the Daphnia. At initial concentrations of 0.10 M, 0.25 M, and 0.40 M, only Daphnia in the control group survived past the first day. After this, new concentration groups of 0.050 M and 0.075 M were made, and the treatments were continued. Heartbeats of each Daphnia were counted for fifteen seconds and recorded after one day of fertilizer exposure. No Daphnia survived past one day of exposure to phosphate solutions 0.050 M and 0.075 M. Heart rate data was statistically analyzed with a one-way ANOVA at the alpha=0.05 level. In conclusion, the introduction of phosphate fertilizer appears to be detrimental to Daphnia magna and, thus, at �� = 0.05, exposure to increasing levels of phosphorus correspond to a lower heart rate, F(2,47)=105.98, p = 0.05. A Scheffe test determined that significant differences were between the control group and each tested concentration.

Location

Furman Hall 227

Start Date

3-28-2020 12:15 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 12:15 PM

The Effect of Phosphate Fertilizer on Heart Rate and Population of Daphnia magna

Furman Hall 227

The amount of eutrophication occurring as a result of chemical water pollution is rapidly increasing in numerous aquatic environments. Although a balance of Nitrogen - Phosphorus - Potassium (NPK) is necessary to sustain necessary biological and ecological processes, excessive use of fertilizers has led to increased algal growth and disruption of aquatic ecosystems. To determine whether the introduction of phosphate-based fertilizer into an aquatic ecosystem could pose a potential threat to such habitants, this research examined the effect of phosphate fertilizer on Daphnia magna heart rate and mortality after exposure. Daphnia magna were placed in solutions of phosphate fertilizer at varying concentrations over a span of three days and their heart rate was collected prior to and after exposure to the fertilizer. It was hypothesized that increases in concentration would cause D. magna to have elevated heart rates due to the strain the environmental change would have on the Daphnia. At initial concentrations of 0.10 M, 0.25 M, and 0.40 M, only Daphnia in the control group survived past the first day. After this, new concentration groups of 0.050 M and 0.075 M were made, and the treatments were continued. Heartbeats of each Daphnia were counted for fifteen seconds and recorded after one day of fertilizer exposure. No Daphnia survived past one day of exposure to phosphate solutions 0.050 M and 0.075 M. Heart rate data was statistically analyzed with a one-way ANOVA at the alpha=0.05 level. In conclusion, the introduction of phosphate fertilizer appears to be detrimental to Daphnia magna and, thus, at �� = 0.05, exposure to increasing levels of phosphorus correspond to a lower heart rate, F(2,47)=105.98, p = 0.05. A Scheffe test determined that significant differences were between the control group and each tested concentration.