Title

Real Time Digital Simulation of Power Systems With a Hardware-In-The-Loop Setup

Author(s)

Liam BagwellFollow

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

The effectiveness of power systems is often reliant on the measures put in place to defend against fault events. Substations that negotiate the distribution of power to loads must be able to detect overcurrents down the line quickly and accurately in order to determine whether or not to deny power to a load. In order to test currently operating power systems' reactions to fault events without potentially impairing service, we created a Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) system that is governed by a Real Time Digital Simulation of a power system. We created maps of the wiring between the Schweizer Engineering Laboratories (SEL) relays that functioned as substation relays and the Real Time Digital Simulator's digital and analog input/output cards. Thereafter, I created new cabling to connect the newly configured devices to the RTDS machine and a Doble voltage amplifier to increase the simulated output to realistic levels. Lastly, I constructed a simulatory power system in RSCAD to validate the functionality of the system, while applying simulation-specific overcurrent settings to the relay. Preliminary tests of the HIL system proved functionality was attained. The setup can now be used to simulate fault events to assess real power systems.

Location

Johns Hall 109

Start Date

3-28-2020 8:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 8:45 AM

Real Time Digital Simulation of Power Systems With a Hardware-In-The-Loop Setup

Johns Hall 109

The effectiveness of power systems is often reliant on the measures put in place to defend against fault events. Substations that negotiate the distribution of power to loads must be able to detect overcurrents down the line quickly and accurately in order to determine whether or not to deny power to a load. In order to test currently operating power systems' reactions to fault events without potentially impairing service, we created a Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) system that is governed by a Real Time Digital Simulation of a power system. We created maps of the wiring between the Schweizer Engineering Laboratories (SEL) relays that functioned as substation relays and the Real Time Digital Simulator's digital and analog input/output cards. Thereafter, I created new cabling to connect the newly configured devices to the RTDS machine and a Doble voltage amplifier to increase the simulated output to realistic levels. Lastly, I constructed a simulatory power system in RSCAD to validate the functionality of the system, while applying simulation-specific overcurrent settings to the relay. Preliminary tests of the HIL system proved functionality was attained. The setup can now be used to simulate fault events to assess real power systems.