Title

Measuring Nociceptive Pain Occurring During Intraoperative Awareness

Author(s)

Taylor Morris

School Name

Center For Advanced Technical Studies

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Biochemistry

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The goal of this research is determining which part of the brain should be measured during administration of general anesthesia in order to detect intraoperative awareness. It is important to protect the safety and stability of patients while in the operating room and through post-operation. It can also aid in preventing lawsuits and faulty surgeries by impacting the future of anesthetic monitoring as well as patients who undergo general anesthesia. It will ensure their safety as well as the success rate of surgery without complications. Patients who experience awareness are able to recall events that happened during surgery as well as feel pain while the surgery progresses. This can leave patients with psychological and physical complications, and there are currently no effective ways of measuring or preventing it from occurring. Most previous research studies have focused on how many people awareness effects and what could possibly have caused it; this research focuses on how it can be prevented by understanding how anesthesia changes the neurological pathways and how it can be regulated within operation rooms. By reviewing how sensory information is received by the brain under different administrations of anesthesia, it is possible to determine which part of the brain needs to be monitored. By reading through case studies, it will also be possible to understand how it affects patients and possible causes of the event. Reviewing how the biochemical makeup of the somatosensory cortex alters while under anesthesia is key to determining what should be monitored to detect awareness.

Location

Furman Hall 118

Start Date

3-28-2020 8:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 8:45 AM

Measuring Nociceptive Pain Occurring During Intraoperative Awareness

Furman Hall 118

The goal of this research is determining which part of the brain should be measured during administration of general anesthesia in order to detect intraoperative awareness. It is important to protect the safety and stability of patients while in the operating room and through post-operation. It can also aid in preventing lawsuits and faulty surgeries by impacting the future of anesthetic monitoring as well as patients who undergo general anesthesia. It will ensure their safety as well as the success rate of surgery without complications. Patients who experience awareness are able to recall events that happened during surgery as well as feel pain while the surgery progresses. This can leave patients with psychological and physical complications, and there are currently no effective ways of measuring or preventing it from occurring. Most previous research studies have focused on how many people awareness effects and what could possibly have caused it; this research focuses on how it can be prevented by understanding how anesthesia changes the neurological pathways and how it can be regulated within operation rooms. By reviewing how sensory information is received by the brain under different administrations of anesthesia, it is possible to determine which part of the brain needs to be monitored. By reading through case studies, it will also be possible to understand how it affects patients and possible causes of the event. Reviewing how the biochemical makeup of the somatosensory cortex alters while under anesthesia is key to determining what should be monitored to detect awareness.