Title

The Effect of Shoulder Sling Rotation on Symptom Recurrence and Recovery In Rotator Cuff Repair

Author(s)

Brandon Jolley

School Name

Center For Advanced Technical Studies

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Although rotator cuff tears are the most common shoulder injury in the United States, very little has been done in regards to studying the most effective rotation angle used in immobilization to reduce variability among slings used by orthopedists and reduce retear rates. This study seeks to discover the ideal rotation of sling immobilization for rotator cuff repair patients to reduce symptom occurrence, while also being effective at range of motion recovery, which I believe is at a 45° angle from the body. Patients will be randomly assigned 3 different, effective, slings with differing rotation angles. The study will be completed by recruiting orthopedic surgeons who perform double row repair surgery and have the same postoperative exercise plan, to keep variables focused on solely immobilization. As patients come to these surgeons for rotator cuff repair surgery, they will have the option to participate in the study. If they desire to, the surgeon will hand them the survey at each check up following the surgery, until they are removed from the sling, and will be given surveys following immobilization monthly for a year, noting their pain and range of motion.

Location

Furman Hall 209

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:45 AM

The Effect of Shoulder Sling Rotation on Symptom Recurrence and Recovery In Rotator Cuff Repair

Furman Hall 209

Although rotator cuff tears are the most common shoulder injury in the United States, very little has been done in regards to studying the most effective rotation angle used in immobilization to reduce variability among slings used by orthopedists and reduce retear rates. This study seeks to discover the ideal rotation of sling immobilization for rotator cuff repair patients to reduce symptom occurrence, while also being effective at range of motion recovery, which I believe is at a 45° angle from the body. Patients will be randomly assigned 3 different, effective, slings with differing rotation angles. The study will be completed by recruiting orthopedic surgeons who perform double row repair surgery and have the same postoperative exercise plan, to keep variables focused on solely immobilization. As patients come to these surgeons for rotator cuff repair surgery, they will have the option to participate in the study. If they desire to, the surgeon will hand them the survey at each check up following the surgery, until they are removed from the sling, and will be given surveys following immobilization monthly for a year, noting their pain and range of motion.