Title

The Effectiveness of Natural Bleaches on Killing Staphylococcus spidermidis Respect to Sodium Hypochlorite

Author(s)

Daniel Sobel

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment is to determine the effectiveness of liquid bleach alternatives killing Staphylococcus Epidermidis with respect to sodium hypochlorite (Liquid Bleach). To test this, 60 petri dishes were filled with Nutrient Agar, then Staphylococcus epidermidis was streaked across each plate. Soon after the antibiotic sensitivity discs that had been soaked in lemon juice, hydrogen peroxide, 10% citric acid solution, and diluted bleach were placed into 60 sterile petri dishes with about 2 discs per petri dish depending on the quality of the petri dish in terms of amount of unmelted agar. After incubating in a 37°C incubator for 48 hours, the petri dishes were taken out of the incubator and had diameters of the area in which no bacteria survived around the filter paper, measured. The results of the experiment found that Hydrogen Peroxide's zone of inhibition's diameter was the most effective cleaning agent by a 59.4% margin and was even more effective than bleach. This finding suggests that people should replace their usage of bleach with hydrogen peroxide in order to have the most effective cleaning of bacteria.

Location

Furman Hall 126

Start Date

3-28-2020 10:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 10:45 AM

The Effectiveness of Natural Bleaches on Killing Staphylococcus spidermidis Respect to Sodium Hypochlorite

Furman Hall 126

The purpose of this experiment is to determine the effectiveness of liquid bleach alternatives killing Staphylococcus Epidermidis with respect to sodium hypochlorite (Liquid Bleach). To test this, 60 petri dishes were filled with Nutrient Agar, then Staphylococcus epidermidis was streaked across each plate. Soon after the antibiotic sensitivity discs that had been soaked in lemon juice, hydrogen peroxide, 10% citric acid solution, and diluted bleach were placed into 60 sterile petri dishes with about 2 discs per petri dish depending on the quality of the petri dish in terms of amount of unmelted agar. After incubating in a 37°C incubator for 48 hours, the petri dishes were taken out of the incubator and had diameters of the area in which no bacteria survived around the filter paper, measured. The results of the experiment found that Hydrogen Peroxide's zone of inhibition's diameter was the most effective cleaning agent by a 59.4% margin and was even more effective than bleach. This finding suggests that people should replace their usage of bleach with hydrogen peroxide in order to have the most effective cleaning of bacteria.