Title

How Does Body Image Differ Between Genders?

Author(s)

Hanna Coetsee

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to test the correlation between gender and body image. The starting hypothesis was that men would generally have higher body satisfaction than women, while the null hypothesis was that there was no correlation between gender and body image. The independent variable of this experiment was gender, while the dependent variable was the body image calculated. To measure body image, the multidimensional body self-relations questionnaire (MBSRQ), designed by Thomas F. Cash, was purchased and used. Having a total of sixty-nine questions, the test consists of a variety of questions all about body image. The test was distributed to high school students and the answers were kept confidential, ensuring more honest answers from the students. Separate charts were made for each gender and the average answer for each question was calculated. These averages were factored into the calculations to determine a numerical value for the ten subscales of the MBSRQ: appearance evaluation, appearance orientation, fitness evaluation, fitness orientation, health evaluation, health orientation, illness orientation, body areas satisfaction, overweight preoccupation, and self-classified weight. The data showed different averages for men and women for each section, but the results of this study mostly supported the hypothesis, revealing that men generally have more positive body image.

Location

Furman Hall 208

Start Date

3-28-2020 10:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 10:00 AM

How Does Body Image Differ Between Genders?

Furman Hall 208

The purpose of this experiment was to test the correlation between gender and body image. The starting hypothesis was that men would generally have higher body satisfaction than women, while the null hypothesis was that there was no correlation between gender and body image. The independent variable of this experiment was gender, while the dependent variable was the body image calculated. To measure body image, the multidimensional body self-relations questionnaire (MBSRQ), designed by Thomas F. Cash, was purchased and used. Having a total of sixty-nine questions, the test consists of a variety of questions all about body image. The test was distributed to high school students and the answers were kept confidential, ensuring more honest answers from the students. Separate charts were made for each gender and the average answer for each question was calculated. These averages were factored into the calculations to determine a numerical value for the ten subscales of the MBSRQ: appearance evaluation, appearance orientation, fitness evaluation, fitness orientation, health evaluation, health orientation, illness orientation, body areas satisfaction, overweight preoccupation, and self-classified weight. The data showed different averages for men and women for each section, but the results of this study mostly supported the hypothesis, revealing that men generally have more positive body image.