Title

The Effects of Different Light Wavelengths on Their Effectiveness In Killing Cutibacterium acnes Bacteria

Author(s)

Vikram Kneece

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to test the effectiveness of different lights in eradicating Cutibacterium acne (C.acnes) bacteria. This experiment was conducted due to the prevalence of using different light therapies to treat acne and to attempt to find the most effective light for treatment. It was hypothesized that black light would have the most bactericidal effect due to its higher wavelength that is around 365 nm, with UV lights being an effective way to kill bacteria, due to the high frequency. To conduct this experiment, C.acnes bacteria were first cultured at room temperature for 17 days and then placed under the appropriate light for 24 hours, with no light exposure serving as the control. At the end of the 24 hour period, the bacteria colonies were measured to determine the bactericidal impact. After experimentation, blue light was shown to be the most effective at killing bacteria. Red light and blacklight also inhibited effects on killing bacteria, while LED light and the control allowed the bacteria to continue to grow. An ANOVA test concluded that the different light wavelength's effects on inhibiting C. acnes growth was not significant; F(0.93)

Location

Furman Hall 126

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:15 AM

The Effects of Different Light Wavelengths on Their Effectiveness In Killing Cutibacterium acnes Bacteria

Furman Hall 126

The purpose of this experiment was to test the effectiveness of different lights in eradicating Cutibacterium acne (C.acnes) bacteria. This experiment was conducted due to the prevalence of using different light therapies to treat acne and to attempt to find the most effective light for treatment. It was hypothesized that black light would have the most bactericidal effect due to its higher wavelength that is around 365 nm, with UV lights being an effective way to kill bacteria, due to the high frequency. To conduct this experiment, C.acnes bacteria were first cultured at room temperature for 17 days and then placed under the appropriate light for 24 hours, with no light exposure serving as the control. At the end of the 24 hour period, the bacteria colonies were measured to determine the bactericidal impact. After experimentation, blue light was shown to be the most effective at killing bacteria. Red light and blacklight also inhibited effects on killing bacteria, while LED light and the control allowed the bacteria to continue to grow. An ANOVA test concluded that the different light wavelength's effects on inhibiting C. acnes growth was not significant; F(0.93)