Title

Radar Imaging Using Unmanned Aircraft Systems and Synthetic Aperture Radar

Author(s)

John TurnerFollow

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Computer Science

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

The remote imaging capabilities of radar are already commonly used in military surveillance, but remote imaging is also possible on less sophisticated systems. Developing algorithms that process radar data captured on these systems allows for sufficiently clear images to be formed, lowering the cost barrier for radar imaging. A low power PulsON 440 radar was used alongside a F550 six-rotor drone, also referred to as an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), used to carry the radar. Testing was conducted in several formats to develop separate pieces of the software. A stationary radar scan was the first test, which tested the functionality of the radar control and data collection software. The next test used a radar being carried to take scans, used to test an algorithm known as back-projection. Through this technique, the successive radar scans are stitched together to form an image of objects detected by the radar. This is known as synthetic aperture radar, which uses motion to simulate having a larger radar. This process was then converted for use with the UAS through use of a motion capture system. Both range and time were aligned to match the scan data and the motion capture data. The final test of this software was the scanning of a scene of hidden objects. Our radar successfully imaged a crisp image of the scene, with imaged soda cans being individually identifiable. This test successfully demonstrated the potential of low power radar for remote imaging.

Location

Furman Hall 109

Start Date

3-28-2020 12:15 PM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 12:15 PM

Radar Imaging Using Unmanned Aircraft Systems and Synthetic Aperture Radar

Furman Hall 109

The remote imaging capabilities of radar are already commonly used in military surveillance, but remote imaging is also possible on less sophisticated systems. Developing algorithms that process radar data captured on these systems allows for sufficiently clear images to be formed, lowering the cost barrier for radar imaging. A low power PulsON 440 radar was used alongside a F550 six-rotor drone, also referred to as an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), used to carry the radar. Testing was conducted in several formats to develop separate pieces of the software. A stationary radar scan was the first test, which tested the functionality of the radar control and data collection software. The next test used a radar being carried to take scans, used to test an algorithm known as back-projection. Through this technique, the successive radar scans are stitched together to form an image of objects detected by the radar. This is known as synthetic aperture radar, which uses motion to simulate having a larger radar. This process was then converted for use with the UAS through use of a motion capture system. Both range and time were aligned to match the scan data and the motion capture data. The final test of this software was the scanning of a scene of hidden objects. Our radar successfully imaged a crisp image of the scene, with imaged soda cans being individually identifiable. This test successfully demonstrated the potential of low power radar for remote imaging.