Title

The Effect of Pesticides and Preservatives on Fruits.

Author(s)

Derek Lewis

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

This experiment was performed to find the effects of pesticides and preservatives on a fruit's shelf-life. To begin the experiment, four small containers were prepared for a set of strawberries and a set of blueberries for each trial. Two fruits, one organic and one non-organic, were set up in a greenhouse, while the other two were placed in a dark room at room temperature. Over the course of 10 days, the state of the fruit was recorded on a daily basis. Pictures were taken when any notable change occurred. It is important when conducting this experiment that the idea of "spoiled" is the same for every fruit involved in the trial. The results of the research suggest that, while the spoiling can be ascribed to many different variables, the shelf-life of the fruit does not differ much. Each trial produced nearly the same results. Surprisingly, all of the non-organic strawberries developed mold on the flesh of the fruit before the organic strawberries, while the only blueberries to show any superficial change were the organic blueberries set up in the greenhouse. From the results of the experiment, the strawberry trials suggest that the organic strawberries spoil and dehydrate slightly faster, but mold slower than the non-organic strawberries. The blueberry trials turned out rather uncertain because of only one fruit in each trial showing any degradation.

Location

Furman Hall 227

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:45 AM

The Effect of Pesticides and Preservatives on Fruits.

Furman Hall 227

This experiment was performed to find the effects of pesticides and preservatives on a fruit's shelf-life. To begin the experiment, four small containers were prepared for a set of strawberries and a set of blueberries for each trial. Two fruits, one organic and one non-organic, were set up in a greenhouse, while the other two were placed in a dark room at room temperature. Over the course of 10 days, the state of the fruit was recorded on a daily basis. Pictures were taken when any notable change occurred. It is important when conducting this experiment that the idea of "spoiled" is the same for every fruit involved in the trial. The results of the research suggest that, while the spoiling can be ascribed to many different variables, the shelf-life of the fruit does not differ much. Each trial produced nearly the same results. Surprisingly, all of the non-organic strawberries developed mold on the flesh of the fruit before the organic strawberries, while the only blueberries to show any superficial change were the organic blueberries set up in the greenhouse. From the results of the experiment, the strawberry trials suggest that the organic strawberries spoil and dehydrate slightly faster, but mold slower than the non-organic strawberries. The blueberry trials turned out rather uncertain because of only one fruit in each trial showing any degradation.