Title

The Effect of Ultraviolet Radiation on the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Author(s)

Jimmy Ruskell

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

This experiment's purpose is to determine the effects of different exposure times of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), a model organism for experiments dealing with all types of life, including human skin cells. One of the most common diseases of human skin is skin cancer, which is mostly caused by direct contact with UV rays. In this experiment, small circles of S. cerevisiae were placed in the center of a petri dish, exposed to UV rays, and left to grow in a humid incubator for two days. The amount of S. cerevisiae growth was then counted over a piece of graph paper in square centimeters. 180 dishes were recorded, with four levels of exposure and a control group. The results suggested that the longer S. cerevisiae is exposed to UV radiation, the more growth it will have. The control group, treated with no UV radiation, had an average growth area of 1.03 cm2 ; the group treated with 20 minutes of UV radiation had an average growth area of 3.43 cm2; the group treated with 30 minutes of UV radiation had an average growth area of 7.86 cm2 ; and the group treated with 40 minutes of UV radiation had an average growth area of 16.97 cm2 . However, these results are likely a result of some error made during the procedure, because every other paper studied for this paper reached a result suggesting that extended UV radiation exposure stunts the growth of S. cerevisiae.

Location

Furman Hall 126

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:45 AM

The Effect of Ultraviolet Radiation on the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Furman Hall 126

This experiment's purpose is to determine the effects of different exposure times of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), a model organism for experiments dealing with all types of life, including human skin cells. One of the most common diseases of human skin is skin cancer, which is mostly caused by direct contact with UV rays. In this experiment, small circles of S. cerevisiae were placed in the center of a petri dish, exposed to UV rays, and left to grow in a humid incubator for two days. The amount of S. cerevisiae growth was then counted over a piece of graph paper in square centimeters. 180 dishes were recorded, with four levels of exposure and a control group. The results suggested that the longer S. cerevisiae is exposed to UV radiation, the more growth it will have. The control group, treated with no UV radiation, had an average growth area of 1.03 cm2 ; the group treated with 20 minutes of UV radiation had an average growth area of 3.43 cm2; the group treated with 30 minutes of UV radiation had an average growth area of 7.86 cm2 ; and the group treated with 40 minutes of UV radiation had an average growth area of 16.97 cm2 . However, these results are likely a result of some error made during the procedure, because every other paper studied for this paper reached a result suggesting that extended UV radiation exposure stunts the growth of S. cerevisiae.