Title

A New Psychological Gate Theory Take on Easing Needle-Phobia

Author(s)

Allison Spirek

School Name

Center For Advanced Technical Studies

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

This project is aimed towards improving the psychological effects of receiving an intramuscular injection, specifically for pediatric patients. Needle-Phobia is a psychological disorder that affects the mental state of a patient prior to an injection. The needle and syringe are concealed from the patient's eye to aid in intense side effects some needle phobics have in response to the sight of a needle. This device also incorporates cooling and vibrational components that act to invoke the Gate Theory for Pain. Large nerve fibers and small nerve fibers are stimulated when receiving an injection. The vibrational and cooling components of the device stimulate large nerve fibers, which minimize the signals of pain that are transmitted by small nerve fibers, thus reducing the painful sensation of the needle entering the skin. The device's ability to relieve pain cannot be tested, however assessment can be based towards the device's success in relieving anxiety and its ability to function overall. Evaluation of the device consists of scales ranging from one through ten for rating aspects such as patient reliability on the device as well as feelings towards the outward appearance. The device has been evaluated by medical professionals, parents, and children to gain feedback on how to improve as well as whether or not the idea of having the device available to use provides any sort of comfort as opposed to a bare needle. Preliminary data elicits that the device provides a positive response and improves the idea of receiving an injection.

Location

Furman Hall 207

Start Date

3-28-2020 10:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 10:00 AM

A New Psychological Gate Theory Take on Easing Needle-Phobia

Furman Hall 207

This project is aimed towards improving the psychological effects of receiving an intramuscular injection, specifically for pediatric patients. Needle-Phobia is a psychological disorder that affects the mental state of a patient prior to an injection. The needle and syringe are concealed from the patient's eye to aid in intense side effects some needle phobics have in response to the sight of a needle. This device also incorporates cooling and vibrational components that act to invoke the Gate Theory for Pain. Large nerve fibers and small nerve fibers are stimulated when receiving an injection. The vibrational and cooling components of the device stimulate large nerve fibers, which minimize the signals of pain that are transmitted by small nerve fibers, thus reducing the painful sensation of the needle entering the skin. The device's ability to relieve pain cannot be tested, however assessment can be based towards the device's success in relieving anxiety and its ability to function overall. Evaluation of the device consists of scales ranging from one through ten for rating aspects such as patient reliability on the device as well as feelings towards the outward appearance. The device has been evaluated by medical professionals, parents, and children to gain feedback on how to improve as well as whether or not the idea of having the device available to use provides any sort of comfort as opposed to a bare needle. Preliminary data elicits that the device provides a positive response and improves the idea of receiving an injection.