Title

The Effect of Ultraviolet Light Radiation and Natural Lemon Oils on the Lifespan of Daphnia magna

Author(s)

Christopher Park

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

This study examined the effects of UV light radiation and a range of natural lemon oil concentrations to identify lifespan observations in Daphnia magna. The purpose of this experiment was to identify the appropriate amount of natural lemon oil (NLO), resulting in safer water quality without significantly reducing the lifespan of Daphnia. It was hypothesized that an increase in the number of drops of NLOs would increase the water quality (lower the parts per million) but reduce the lifespan of Daphnia magna. An environment was constructed for the Daphnia, such as a cooler, which was filled with a gallon of spring water. The UV light source was placed in a corner in a slanted position. Each environment contained separate concentrations of the NLO, and a Daphnia was placed in the water. The control (zero drops of NLO) had a range of 97-99 ppm and a lifespan range of 110-118 minutes. The environment that contained 15 drops of NLOs had a range of 78-81 ppm and a lifespan range of 59-61 minutes. The significance of the data identifies remarkable toxicity levels regarding the use of NLOs, especially at higher level concentrations. Utility companies should avoid the use of these oils to prevent wildlife toxication.

Location

Furman Hall 227

Start Date

3-28-2020 10:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 10:00 AM

The Effect of Ultraviolet Light Radiation and Natural Lemon Oils on the Lifespan of Daphnia magna

Furman Hall 227

This study examined the effects of UV light radiation and a range of natural lemon oil concentrations to identify lifespan observations in Daphnia magna. The purpose of this experiment was to identify the appropriate amount of natural lemon oil (NLO), resulting in safer water quality without significantly reducing the lifespan of Daphnia. It was hypothesized that an increase in the number of drops of NLOs would increase the water quality (lower the parts per million) but reduce the lifespan of Daphnia magna. An environment was constructed for the Daphnia, such as a cooler, which was filled with a gallon of spring water. The UV light source was placed in a corner in a slanted position. Each environment contained separate concentrations of the NLO, and a Daphnia was placed in the water. The control (zero drops of NLO) had a range of 97-99 ppm and a lifespan range of 110-118 minutes. The environment that contained 15 drops of NLOs had a range of 78-81 ppm and a lifespan range of 59-61 minutes. The significance of the data identifies remarkable toxicity levels regarding the use of NLOs, especially at higher level concentrations. Utility companies should avoid the use of these oils to prevent wildlife toxication.