Title

Improvement of the Power Density of Microbial Fuel Cells

Author(s)

Isaac Brewer

School Name

Center For Advanced Technical Studies

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Water and energy are two of the most precious resources to today's societies. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) could secure energy neutral clean water by filtering waste water and using sludge collected to power the filtration, thus creating energy neutral clean water filtration. To accomplish this, the technology behind MFCs require optimization. The first of these variables to be optimized is temperature. It is hypothesized the metabolism of a MFCs will be higher at higher temperatures. In order to measure the metabolism of a MFC, the voltage produced by the microbes must be recorded. To accurately compare MFC performance at different temperatures, six identical MFCs were constructed, three were left unheated at about 71° F for 48 hours and the other three were placed on a heated blanket that warms them to about 93.7° F for 48 hours. As expected, the heated MFCs performed better with the average maximum value being 0.62v compared to the 0.263v. This shows that MFCs function better in warmer environments, this is because the microbes metabolism is sped up at the higher temperature which would mean they produce more electrons and in turn higher voltages. These results prove the hypothesis that the metabolism of a MFC is higher at higher temperatures.

Location

Furman Hall 229

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:00 AM

Improvement of the Power Density of Microbial Fuel Cells

Furman Hall 229

Water and energy are two of the most precious resources to today's societies. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) could secure energy neutral clean water by filtering waste water and using sludge collected to power the filtration, thus creating energy neutral clean water filtration. To accomplish this, the technology behind MFCs require optimization. The first of these variables to be optimized is temperature. It is hypothesized the metabolism of a MFCs will be higher at higher temperatures. In order to measure the metabolism of a MFC, the voltage produced by the microbes must be recorded. To accurately compare MFC performance at different temperatures, six identical MFCs were constructed, three were left unheated at about 71° F for 48 hours and the other three were placed on a heated blanket that warms them to about 93.7° F for 48 hours. As expected, the heated MFCs performed better with the average maximum value being 0.62v compared to the 0.263v. This shows that MFCs function better in warmer environments, this is because the microbes metabolism is sped up at the higher temperature which would mean they produce more electrons and in turn higher voltages. These results prove the hypothesis that the metabolism of a MFC is higher at higher temperatures.