Title

Flexible Ion Optics: 3D-Printed Cylindrical Analyzers

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physics

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

We sought to determine the applications of 3D printed materials in high vacuum conditions. The recent rise of additive manufacturing has opened 3D printing for both commercial and personal uses. Currently, space agencies such as NASA employ metal alloys, such as aluminum and steel, for use in the vacuum of space. However, manufacturing such materials has proven to be cost-ineffective and time-consuming. In addition, there is insufficient data on how 3D-printed plastics behave in low pressure systems. Verifying the application of 3D-printed plastic materials for use in such systems, therefore, will not only provide a reliable alternative to conventional metals, but also provide insight into other uses of 3D printing. To find the effectiveness of 3D-printed plastic, we tested the deflection of Na+ ion beams across 90 and 270 degree cylindrical loops of conductive polylactic acid (PLA). We set up an adjustable high voltage supply to ground one wall of the loop and vary the voltage on the other. Then, we sent sodium ion beams of varying energies from 100 eV to 3000 eV to determine the voltages that would best bend the sodium beams. We expected the results to show that the 3D-printed PLA loops would be able to hold appreciable voltage to bend the beams regardless of the energy within our range.

Location

Furman Hall 127

Start Date

3-28-2020 12:00 PM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 12:00 PM

Flexible Ion Optics: 3D-Printed Cylindrical Analyzers

Furman Hall 127

We sought to determine the applications of 3D printed materials in high vacuum conditions. The recent rise of additive manufacturing has opened 3D printing for both commercial and personal uses. Currently, space agencies such as NASA employ metal alloys, such as aluminum and steel, for use in the vacuum of space. However, manufacturing such materials has proven to be cost-ineffective and time-consuming. In addition, there is insufficient data on how 3D-printed plastics behave in low pressure systems. Verifying the application of 3D-printed plastic materials for use in such systems, therefore, will not only provide a reliable alternative to conventional metals, but also provide insight into other uses of 3D printing. To find the effectiveness of 3D-printed plastic, we tested the deflection of Na+ ion beams across 90 and 270 degree cylindrical loops of conductive polylactic acid (PLA). We set up an adjustable high voltage supply to ground one wall of the loop and vary the voltage on the other. Then, we sent sodium ion beams of varying energies from 100 eV to 3000 eV to determine the voltages that would best bend the sodium beams. We expected the results to show that the 3D-printed PLA loops would be able to hold appreciable voltage to bend the beams regardless of the energy within our range.