Title

The Effect of Changing the Airfoil Type and Angle of Attack on the Amount of Lift Produced (Pa)

Author(s)

Anish Kulkarni

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Because of globalization, there has been a rapid increase in the use of commercial airplanes. However, the impact of aircraft emissions are not as widely discussed as other forms of transportation such as cars and other automobiles (Pardee, 2015). The purpose of this experiment was to determine how different angle of attacks affect different airfoils in order to increase the amount of lift produced. With a higher lift coefficient, there would be less of a need to use more fuel because the airplane will be able to stay aloft with less energy expended. It was hypothesized that if the angle of attack is 10 degrees for the Clark Y design, then the most amount of lift will be produced during the one minute interval because anything past 12 degrees would often result in a stall (Hall, 2018). The three different airfoils were each tested with a 0, 5, 10, and 15 degree angle of attack, each trial lasting 1 minute. A total of 10 trials were conducted for each airfoil for each angle of attack. The results showed that the RE 15 had the greatest mean lift coefficient, while the 2100 had the lowest lift coefficient. When each data set was graphed, only the Clark-Y with the angle of attack with 5 had a normal distribution, while all the others were either skewed to the left or right (Appendix B).

Location

John's Hall 105

Start Date

3-28-2020 10:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 10:15 AM

The Effect of Changing the Airfoil Type and Angle of Attack on the Amount of Lift Produced (Pa)

John's Hall 105

Because of globalization, there has been a rapid increase in the use of commercial airplanes. However, the impact of aircraft emissions are not as widely discussed as other forms of transportation such as cars and other automobiles (Pardee, 2015). The purpose of this experiment was to determine how different angle of attacks affect different airfoils in order to increase the amount of lift produced. With a higher lift coefficient, there would be less of a need to use more fuel because the airplane will be able to stay aloft with less energy expended. It was hypothesized that if the angle of attack is 10 degrees for the Clark Y design, then the most amount of lift will be produced during the one minute interval because anything past 12 degrees would often result in a stall (Hall, 2018). The three different airfoils were each tested with a 0, 5, 10, and 15 degree angle of attack, each trial lasting 1 minute. A total of 10 trials were conducted for each airfoil for each angle of attack. The results showed that the RE 15 had the greatest mean lift coefficient, while the 2100 had the lowest lift coefficient. When each data set was graphed, only the Clark-Y with the angle of attack with 5 had a normal distribution, while all the others were either skewed to the left or right (Appendix B).