Title

The Effect of Various Quantities of Chitosan on the Bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri

Author(s)

Madeline Nealey

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Developing countries without adequate access to electricity burn trash in order to create a source of light. This is not a sound way to produce light because fumes pollute the air. Vibrio fischeri, a bioluminescent bacteria, can be utilized to create a light source; however, a substance must be added to the bacteria in order to make it bright enough to be a substantial source of light. Chitosan naturally occurs in V. fischeri's habitat, so it makes for a reasonable material to increase V. fischeri's brightness in addition to its energizing capabilities (Dixit & Carroll, 2018). It was hypothesized that subcultures given 0.7 g of chitosan extract powder for 48 hours will emit the most bioluminescence. In the experiment, 0 g, 0.1 g, 0.4 g, and 0.7 g of chitosan were added to 30 trials, each containing V. fischeri and 30 mL of photobacterium broth. After 24 and 48 hours of time to allow the bacteria to luminesce, images of each subculture were taken, then converted to black-and-white and put into ImageJ to calculate its corrected total cell fluorescence (CTCF). The ANOVA test revealed that differences in experimental groups were significant: F(7, 232) = 2.83, p = 0.008. However, the results of the experiment were inconclusive; none of the subcultures luminesced due to outside factors and possible sources of error. Possible reasons could be overexposure to particles in the air—which could have killed the bacteria—or that the subcultures needed to remain agitated.

Location

Furman Hall 126

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:30 AM

The Effect of Various Quantities of Chitosan on the Bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri

Furman Hall 126

Developing countries without adequate access to electricity burn trash in order to create a source of light. This is not a sound way to produce light because fumes pollute the air. Vibrio fischeri, a bioluminescent bacteria, can be utilized to create a light source; however, a substance must be added to the bacteria in order to make it bright enough to be a substantial source of light. Chitosan naturally occurs in V. fischeri's habitat, so it makes for a reasonable material to increase V. fischeri's brightness in addition to its energizing capabilities (Dixit & Carroll, 2018). It was hypothesized that subcultures given 0.7 g of chitosan extract powder for 48 hours will emit the most bioluminescence. In the experiment, 0 g, 0.1 g, 0.4 g, and 0.7 g of chitosan were added to 30 trials, each containing V. fischeri and 30 mL of photobacterium broth. After 24 and 48 hours of time to allow the bacteria to luminesce, images of each subculture were taken, then converted to black-and-white and put into ImageJ to calculate its corrected total cell fluorescence (CTCF). The ANOVA test revealed that differences in experimental groups were significant: F(7, 232) = 2.83, p = 0.008. However, the results of the experiment were inconclusive; none of the subcultures luminesced due to outside factors and possible sources of error. Possible reasons could be overexposure to particles in the air—which could have killed the bacteria—or that the subcultures needed to remain agitated.