Title

The Effect of Silica Grain Sizes on the Effectiveness of Fluidization.

Author(s)

Tim Nguyen

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Erosion of soil and sand has become a major issue near riversides and rural areas due to either water or wind picking up soil or sand particles easily. Fluidization, the process of temporarily transforming a cluster of individual particles into a fluid-like state, is one of the reasons behind erosion,but by slowing down the fluidization process, erosion would slow down as well. It has been hypothesized that the larger the grains are, the longer it would take to fluidize the sand. This experiment used 70, 100, 1250, 3000 mesh sand as well as a control sand. The fluidized bed reactor (FBR) used was connected to an air compressor with a dial and this was used to calculate the pressure needed to fluidize the silicon dioxide. It was suggested that there was substantial evidence to reject the claim that the mesh of the silica particles did not have an effect on the pressure needed to fluidize them. A Tukey test showed a significant difference between the control variable and the 70 and 100 mesh silicon dioxide, with a q value of 15.51 and 16.05 respectively. However, the 70 mesh and 100 mesh did not have a significant difference, having the q value of 0.53. The 1250 mesh and 3000 mesh silicon dioxide did not fluidize properly, therefore not being collected. Overall this experiment showed that there is substantial evidence to reject the claim that the grain size has no correlation with the effectiveness of fluidization.

Location

John's Hall 107

Start Date

3-28-2020 11:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 11:30 AM

The Effect of Silica Grain Sizes on the Effectiveness of Fluidization.

John's Hall 107

Erosion of soil and sand has become a major issue near riversides and rural areas due to either water or wind picking up soil or sand particles easily. Fluidization, the process of temporarily transforming a cluster of individual particles into a fluid-like state, is one of the reasons behind erosion,but by slowing down the fluidization process, erosion would slow down as well. It has been hypothesized that the larger the grains are, the longer it would take to fluidize the sand. This experiment used 70, 100, 1250, 3000 mesh sand as well as a control sand. The fluidized bed reactor (FBR) used was connected to an air compressor with a dial and this was used to calculate the pressure needed to fluidize the silicon dioxide. It was suggested that there was substantial evidence to reject the claim that the mesh of the silica particles did not have an effect on the pressure needed to fluidize them. A Tukey test showed a significant difference between the control variable and the 70 and 100 mesh silicon dioxide, with a q value of 15.51 and 16.05 respectively. However, the 70 mesh and 100 mesh did not have a significant difference, having the q value of 0.53. The 1250 mesh and 3000 mesh silicon dioxide did not fluidize properly, therefore not being collected. Overall this experiment showed that there is substantial evidence to reject the claim that the grain size has no correlation with the effectiveness of fluidization.