Title

An Analysis of the Spread of Antibiotic Resistance to Ampicillin In Escherichia coli

Author(s)

Jackson Engh

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

9th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Eschericia coli, like all bacteria, hold the ability to rapidly evolve and develop resistance to potentially fatal substances, such as antibiotics. This experiment evaluated the spread of ampicillin resistance genes through a population via conjugation. Two strains of Eschericia coli, one resistant to ampicillin and one sensitive to ampicillin, were plated on normal agar petri dishes. 3 samples of the naturally resistant colonies were mixed with 3 samples of the sensitive colonies of Escherichia coli. After 24 hours of incubation, each of the 3 acquired resistance vials and 3 initial resistance vials were plated onto 2 fresh petri dishes, one containing ampicillin and the other not containing ampicillin. The growth of the bacteria was measured through a count of each visible, individual colony. The results of the experiment found that groups with initial resistance vastly outperformed groups with acquired resistance, thus causing the hypothesis to be incorrect. However, both strains performed better in dishes containing ampicillin than they did in dishes that did not contain ampicillin. As ampicillin should be detrimental for the growth of any strains of Eschericia coli, the odd results of the experiment suggest that there were errors in the execution of the experiment. These errors would likely be the result of the deactivation of ampicillin, or complications with the storage of materials. In order to further test the legitimacy of this experiment, it should be repeated with special care taken to the previously mentioned topics.

Location

Furman Hall 126

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:00 AM

An Analysis of the Spread of Antibiotic Resistance to Ampicillin In Escherichia coli

Furman Hall 126

Eschericia coli, like all bacteria, hold the ability to rapidly evolve and develop resistance to potentially fatal substances, such as antibiotics. This experiment evaluated the spread of ampicillin resistance genes through a population via conjugation. Two strains of Eschericia coli, one resistant to ampicillin and one sensitive to ampicillin, were plated on normal agar petri dishes. 3 samples of the naturally resistant colonies were mixed with 3 samples of the sensitive colonies of Escherichia coli. After 24 hours of incubation, each of the 3 acquired resistance vials and 3 initial resistance vials were plated onto 2 fresh petri dishes, one containing ampicillin and the other not containing ampicillin. The growth of the bacteria was measured through a count of each visible, individual colony. The results of the experiment found that groups with initial resistance vastly outperformed groups with acquired resistance, thus causing the hypothesis to be incorrect. However, both strains performed better in dishes containing ampicillin than they did in dishes that did not contain ampicillin. As ampicillin should be detrimental for the growth of any strains of Eschericia coli, the odd results of the experiment suggest that there were errors in the execution of the experiment. These errors would likely be the result of the deactivation of ampicillin, or complications with the storage of materials. In order to further test the legitimacy of this experiment, it should be repeated with special care taken to the previously mentioned topics.