Title

Effect of Repeated Memory Retrieval on Accuracy and Later Recall

Author(s)

Lainey Stalnaker

School Name

Chapin High School

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Sociology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

A body of work which has been conducted which suggests the fallibility of human memory. This is particularly relevant to the criminal justice system as eyewitness testimony is often a major factor in deciding convictions. This study analyzes memory by calculating changes in accuracy and comparing details of periodic recalls to both the preceding recalls and the initial to determine which it is more similar to. Participants in the study were shown a video of a robbery and asked to recall details by filling out a self administered assessment (SAI). The SAI consisted of 12 short answer questions, some of which could be answered with a "yes" or "no while others were open ended. The level of similarity between two SAI's was quantified by assigning a number from zero to two signifying similarity to each individual question, which were then added up to determine each SAI's comparison score. The comparison scores for all of the participants between two sessions were averaged, and the level of similarity or difference to the other comparison scores was calculated using an ANOVA test. The data gathered supports the hypothesis that each recall will be more similar to the preceding than the initial. To determine changes in accuracy, the number of accurate pieces of information recalled in each SAI was counted up and then analyzed for correlation to time since the initial video viewing. The strength of association between the two variables was determined by calculating the correlation coefficient.

Location

Furman Hall 209

Start Date

3-28-2020 12:00 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 12:00 PM

Effect of Repeated Memory Retrieval on Accuracy and Later Recall

Furman Hall 209

A body of work which has been conducted which suggests the fallibility of human memory. This is particularly relevant to the criminal justice system as eyewitness testimony is often a major factor in deciding convictions. This study analyzes memory by calculating changes in accuracy and comparing details of periodic recalls to both the preceding recalls and the initial to determine which it is more similar to. Participants in the study were shown a video of a robbery and asked to recall details by filling out a self administered assessment (SAI). The SAI consisted of 12 short answer questions, some of which could be answered with a "yes" or "no while others were open ended. The level of similarity between two SAI's was quantified by assigning a number from zero to two signifying similarity to each individual question, which were then added up to determine each SAI's comparison score. The comparison scores for all of the participants between two sessions were averaged, and the level of similarity or difference to the other comparison scores was calculated using an ANOVA test. The data gathered supports the hypothesis that each recall will be more similar to the preceding than the initial. To determine changes in accuracy, the number of accurate pieces of information recalled in each SAI was counted up and then analyzed for correlation to time since the initial video viewing. The strength of association between the two variables was determined by calculating the correlation coefficient.