Title

The Effect of Framing and Intervention on Potential Purchases Made When Shopping

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Framing is a technique that has become quite prevalent and essential in the world of marketing and sales. This study aimed to identify if framing, more specifically attribute framing, affects the amount of money spent when shopping, and if knowledge of the framing effect, could affect its expected outcome. It was first hypothesized that initially participants would not recognize the framing effect, and thus they would be affected by it, causing them to spend more money than the budget allows. It was secondly hypothesized that after the intervention, participants would be able to identify this phenomenon, and thus make smarter purchases by decreasing the amount of money spent. The testing period was split into two stages, pre-intervention and post-intervention. During both stages, a google form simulating a virtual store was used to measure the dependent variable, the amount of money spent. During the pre-intervention stage, participant's total spendings within the form were compared to a set budget, and during the post-intervention stage, spending was compared to the initial spending from the first stage. Paired t-tests were run to test for differences between the results of the two stages, and two-sample t-tests were run to test for differences between results in the post-intervention stage. It was concluded that the framing effect did not cause overspending during the pre-intervention stage, and that the intervention did not cause a significant difference (T=1.83, p=0.088) in the spending occurring during the pre-intervention stage and the post-intervention stage, leaving the hypotheses unsupported.

Location

Furman Hall 208

Start Date

3-28-2020 12:00 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 12:00 PM

The Effect of Framing and Intervention on Potential Purchases Made When Shopping

Furman Hall 208

Framing is a technique that has become quite prevalent and essential in the world of marketing and sales. This study aimed to identify if framing, more specifically attribute framing, affects the amount of money spent when shopping, and if knowledge of the framing effect, could affect its expected outcome. It was first hypothesized that initially participants would not recognize the framing effect, and thus they would be affected by it, causing them to spend more money than the budget allows. It was secondly hypothesized that after the intervention, participants would be able to identify this phenomenon, and thus make smarter purchases by decreasing the amount of money spent. The testing period was split into two stages, pre-intervention and post-intervention. During both stages, a google form simulating a virtual store was used to measure the dependent variable, the amount of money spent. During the pre-intervention stage, participant's total spendings within the form were compared to a set budget, and during the post-intervention stage, spending was compared to the initial spending from the first stage. Paired t-tests were run to test for differences between the results of the two stages, and two-sample t-tests were run to test for differences between results in the post-intervention stage. It was concluded that the framing effect did not cause overspending during the pre-intervention stage, and that the intervention did not cause a significant difference (T=1.83, p=0.088) in the spending occurring during the pre-intervention stage and the post-intervention stage, leaving the hypotheses unsupported.