Title

Suspension of Rat Myocardium In Agarose Gel

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Cell and Molecular Biology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Heart disease affects over 610,000 people every year in the US and is the leading form of death in both men and women. Observing live myocardial tissue has many uses but is difficult due to the short time scale available and the ability to section flexible heart tissue. Myocardium is usually chemically crosslinked or dehydrated in order to make the process of retrieving thin 100 micron slices easier. However, due to the crosslinking or dehydration process, the myocardium will change mechanically and confound live tissue testing. Agarose gel is a useful alternative for cell suspension because it undergoes mild gelation through the formation of extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds resulting in double-helical structures that aggregate into thick bundles (Xiong et al., 2005). When observing the setting of the gel we measured the data qualitatively in various different locations during various periods of time. We found that the best results were achieved after letting the gel set in the hood, incubator, and freezer. Once the procedure has been fully optimized we will use this method to replace conventional methods such as cross-linking and dehydration. When putting the procedure into practice, the best option for the setting of the gel incubator because it will provide a similar environment to the live myocardium's natural state, as well as optimizing the time between extraction and testing. We plan on using this setting method in all future lab work that requires a similar setup.

Location

Furman Hall 107

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

Yes

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:30 AM

Suspension of Rat Myocardium In Agarose Gel

Furman Hall 107

Heart disease affects over 610,000 people every year in the US and is the leading form of death in both men and women. Observing live myocardial tissue has many uses but is difficult due to the short time scale available and the ability to section flexible heart tissue. Myocardium is usually chemically crosslinked or dehydrated in order to make the process of retrieving thin 100 micron slices easier. However, due to the crosslinking or dehydration process, the myocardium will change mechanically and confound live tissue testing. Agarose gel is a useful alternative for cell suspension because it undergoes mild gelation through the formation of extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds resulting in double-helical structures that aggregate into thick bundles (Xiong et al., 2005). When observing the setting of the gel we measured the data qualitatively in various different locations during various periods of time. We found that the best results were achieved after letting the gel set in the hood, incubator, and freezer. Once the procedure has been fully optimized we will use this method to replace conventional methods such as cross-linking and dehydration. When putting the procedure into practice, the best option for the setting of the gel incubator because it will provide a similar environment to the live myocardium's natural state, as well as optimizing the time between extraction and testing. We plan on using this setting method in all future lab work that requires a similar setup.