Title

Using MOFS to Detect Toxins

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Chemistry

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

In recent years, the world has started to realize that the way we're living isn't sustainable. Naturally the demand and need for clean and renewable energy has rapidly increased. The end goal of this research is to solve this problem and more by constructing materials that are capable of creating green energy, detect and capture pollutants and toxins, deliver medicine to our bodies more effectively and transport electron charges in molecular electronic devices. As ambitious as this sounds, my research group play to do this and more by applying a multipronged approach to research, splitting the larger group into teams to solve each of these problems. So far, we have constructed dye-sensitized solar cells by using electron dyads that use light energy and turns it into electricity, we have defined multiple modes of electronic interactions between π-acidic receptors and anions. These, as well as other advances we have made could not only help earth and the people living on it, but it could also serve as a catalyst for future advances in a rapidly advancing field of science. Hopefully helping fellow scientist get close to reaching our goal of a clean and energy efficient world.

Location

Furman Hall 108

Start Date

3-28-2020 11:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 11:00 AM

Using MOFS to Detect Toxins

Furman Hall 108

In recent years, the world has started to realize that the way we're living isn't sustainable. Naturally the demand and need for clean and renewable energy has rapidly increased. The end goal of this research is to solve this problem and more by constructing materials that are capable of creating green energy, detect and capture pollutants and toxins, deliver medicine to our bodies more effectively and transport electron charges in molecular electronic devices. As ambitious as this sounds, my research group play to do this and more by applying a multipronged approach to research, splitting the larger group into teams to solve each of these problems. So far, we have constructed dye-sensitized solar cells by using electron dyads that use light energy and turns it into electricity, we have defined multiple modes of electronic interactions between π-acidic receptors and anions. These, as well as other advances we have made could not only help earth and the people living on it, but it could also serve as a catalyst for future advances in a rapidly advancing field of science. Hopefully helping fellow scientist get close to reaching our goal of a clean and energy efficient world.