Title

The Effect of Water Concentration on a Fruit's Ability to Produce Plasma

Author(s)

Addie-Grace Cook

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physics

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

In the past 10 years, a modest home science trick of a grape split in half spitting plasma has perplexed scientists. That is, until Hamza K. Khattak, Pablo Bianucci, and Aaron D. Slepkov performed a study "Linking Plasma Formation in Grapes to Microwave Resonances of Aqueous Dimers." They found that the sliver of skin left between the grapes held electromagnetic hotspots, using the microwave radiation to create and emit plasma. (Khattak, Bianucci, and Slepkov, 2019) In this study, the effect of a fruit's water content on its ability to emit plasma was investigated. Fruits with water contents 74%-94% were studied: banana, grape, cherry, blueberry, cantaloupe, and cherry tomato. Each fruit was microwaved for 1 minute and videoed with an app that did not edit aperture. The number of sparks and spark intensity were recorded for three trials of each fruit. The study found that plasma was maximized at 85% water content, in the center of the sample set, and dropped off h. However, the results are not statistically significant because the F critical value was greater than the F value.

Location

Furman Hall 127

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:45 AM

The Effect of Water Concentration on a Fruit's Ability to Produce Plasma

Furman Hall 127

In the past 10 years, a modest home science trick of a grape split in half spitting plasma has perplexed scientists. That is, until Hamza K. Khattak, Pablo Bianucci, and Aaron D. Slepkov performed a study "Linking Plasma Formation in Grapes to Microwave Resonances of Aqueous Dimers." They found that the sliver of skin left between the grapes held electromagnetic hotspots, using the microwave radiation to create and emit plasma. (Khattak, Bianucci, and Slepkov, 2019) In this study, the effect of a fruit's water content on its ability to emit plasma was investigated. Fruits with water contents 74%-94% were studied: banana, grape, cherry, blueberry, cantaloupe, and cherry tomato. Each fruit was microwaved for 1 minute and videoed with an app that did not edit aperture. The number of sparks and spark intensity were recorded for three trials of each fruit. The study found that plasma was maximized at 85% water content, in the center of the sample set, and dropped off h. However, the results are not statistically significant because the F critical value was greater than the F value.