Title

The Effect of Low Salinity Levels on the Hatching of Artemia salina and Artemia franciscana

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Artemia serve many purposes within hypersaline environments in which they are found; therefore, it is important to understand their susceptibility to environmental factors. Global warming is an increasingly large issue affecting sea levels, temperatures, and salt concentrations in aquatic environments. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether Artemia salina or Artemia franciscana hatch more readily in water with lower salinities. It was hypothesized salina would have a lower number of nauplii in low salinity environments compared to franciscana, and that both species would fare better in water with a salinity of 30 ppt compared to water at 10 ppt due to regional differences. Artemia cysts were placed in containers with salinities at 30 or 10 ppt. After 24 hours, representative samples from each container were placed under a microscope and the number of nauplii counted. Four individual t-tests were performed to evaluate the relationship between Artemia species and salinity level. It was found Artemia salina in 10/30 ppt and both species hatched in 30 ppt had statistically similar hatch rates, (t(30) =-1.10, p>0.05, t(30) =0.19, p>0.05) and the null hypothesis failed to be rejected. Additionally, fransicana in 10/30 ppt and both species in 10 ppt had statistically different hatch rates, (t(30) = -5.66, p<0.05, t(30) = 7.45, p<0.05), and the null hypothesis was rejected. Artemia salina hatched more readily at 10 ppt, and both species had higher hatch rates at 30 ppt.

Location

HSS 215

Start Date

4-2-2022 11:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 11:00 AM

The Effect of Low Salinity Levels on the Hatching of Artemia salina and Artemia franciscana

HSS 215

Artemia serve many purposes within hypersaline environments in which they are found; therefore, it is important to understand their susceptibility to environmental factors. Global warming is an increasingly large issue affecting sea levels, temperatures, and salt concentrations in aquatic environments. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether Artemia salina or Artemia franciscana hatch more readily in water with lower salinities. It was hypothesized salina would have a lower number of nauplii in low salinity environments compared to franciscana, and that both species would fare better in water with a salinity of 30 ppt compared to water at 10 ppt due to regional differences. Artemia cysts were placed in containers with salinities at 30 or 10 ppt. After 24 hours, representative samples from each container were placed under a microscope and the number of nauplii counted. Four individual t-tests were performed to evaluate the relationship between Artemia species and salinity level. It was found Artemia salina in 10/30 ppt and both species hatched in 30 ppt had statistically similar hatch rates, (t(30) =-1.10, p>0.05, t(30) =0.19, p>0.05) and the null hypothesis failed to be rejected. Additionally, fransicana in 10/30 ppt and both species in 10 ppt had statistically different hatch rates, (t(30) = -5.66, p<0.05, t(30) = 7.45, p<0.05), and the null hypothesis was rejected. Artemia salina hatched more readily at 10 ppt, and both species had higher hatch rates at 30 ppt.