Title

The Effect of First Language on Emotional Understanding of Elementary School Students

Author(s)

Reese MorganFollow

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Behavioral Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

In the United States there are many children who do not speak English. With this barrier for these students there creates a gap in the classroom between non-English speakers and the rest of the class. The purpose of this study was to understand the difference in emotional intelligence between Spanish speaking and English-speaking groups. . It was hypothesized that the emotional intelligence score would be higher for Spanish speaking students than the English speaking students. An emotional intelligence survey was administered to test the hypothesis of a higher emotional quotient score in Spanish speaking students. The students were scored on a scale of 15-60, then a one-way ANOVA was performed on the three groups, English as a first language, Spanish as a first language, or another language as a first language. There was no significant difference in emotional intelligence of the three groups (F(2,43) = 0.4, p = .6). These findings suggest that the difference in first language does not impact human empathy.

Location

B&E 237

Start Date

4-2-2022 10:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 10:45 AM

The Effect of First Language on Emotional Understanding of Elementary School Students

B&E 237

In the United States there are many children who do not speak English. With this barrier for these students there creates a gap in the classroom between non-English speakers and the rest of the class. The purpose of this study was to understand the difference in emotional intelligence between Spanish speaking and English-speaking groups. . It was hypothesized that the emotional intelligence score would be higher for Spanish speaking students than the English speaking students. An emotional intelligence survey was administered to test the hypothesis of a higher emotional quotient score in Spanish speaking students. The students were scored on a scale of 15-60, then a one-way ANOVA was performed on the three groups, English as a first language, Spanish as a first language, or another language as a first language. There was no significant difference in emotional intelligence of the three groups (F(2,43) = 0.4, p = .6). These findings suggest that the difference in first language does not impact human empathy.