Title

Using Multiphase Simulations to Determine the Nature of Self Cleaning Surfaces

Author(s)

John BrentFollow

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physics

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Throughout the world, there have been countless studies on natural hydrophobic surfaces (examples of which include lotus leaves, bird feathers, and rose petals) in attempts to mimic their self-cleaning properties. Despite these studies, nobody could say for certain how the droplets went from the highly adhesive Wenzel state to the far less adhesive Cassie-Baxter state. To solve this conundrum, we used a many-body dissipative particle dynamics (mDPD) simulation to visualize the coalescence of two water droplets in both the Cassie-Baxter state and the Wenzel state. What we found was the droplets in the Cassie-Baxter state made enough energy in their coalescence to jump off the surface, and the droplets in the Wenzel state, though they couldn’t jump off the surface, were able to transition into the Cassie-Baxter state. This information could be used to better create self-cleaning surfaces, as we now know the process by which they work.

Location

HSS 209

Start Date

4-2-2022 11:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 11:15 AM

Using Multiphase Simulations to Determine the Nature of Self Cleaning Surfaces

HSS 209

Throughout the world, there have been countless studies on natural hydrophobic surfaces (examples of which include lotus leaves, bird feathers, and rose petals) in attempts to mimic their self-cleaning properties. Despite these studies, nobody could say for certain how the droplets went from the highly adhesive Wenzel state to the far less adhesive Cassie-Baxter state. To solve this conundrum, we used a many-body dissipative particle dynamics (mDPD) simulation to visualize the coalescence of two water droplets in both the Cassie-Baxter state and the Wenzel state. What we found was the droplets in the Cassie-Baxter state made enough energy in their coalescence to jump off the surface, and the droplets in the Wenzel state, though they couldn’t jump off the surface, were able to transition into the Cassie-Baxter state. This information could be used to better create self-cleaning surfaces, as we now know the process by which they work.