Title

The Effect of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation on Student Success in a Magnet Program

Author(s)

Jisoo LeeFollow

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Behavioral Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Students may be motivated to join a magnet, or a specialized academic program, in secondary school for various reasons. Whether students are intrinsically or extrinsically motivated to join their magnet can be essential for understanding and predicting their success in the program. The purpose of this study was to examine how the type of motivation of magnet students was associated with their perceived learning, academic achievement, and satisfaction. It was hypothesized that students who were intrinsically motivated would have greater perceived learning, academic achievement, and satisfaction than students who were extrinsically motivated due to the potentially harmful effects of extrinsic motivation observed in various studies. Students in the Discovery and Explorations magnet programs at Spring Valley High School were asked to complete a survey to test this hypothesis, and three chi-square tests of independence were conducted to analyze the significance of the data. Results showed that the type of motivation was independent of perceived learning, χ2 (1, N = 90) = 1.56, p = .211, and academic achievement, χ2 (1, N = 82) = 0.09, p = .767. However, type of motivation was significantly correlated with satisfaction, χ2 (1, N = 83) = 4.63, p = .031. These findings suggest that students who are intrinsically motivated to join their magnet programs are more likely to be highly satisfied with their academic experience than extrinsically motivated students are.

Location

B&E 237

Start Date

4-2-2022 9:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 9:00 AM

The Effect of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation on Student Success in a Magnet Program

B&E 237

Students may be motivated to join a magnet, or a specialized academic program, in secondary school for various reasons. Whether students are intrinsically or extrinsically motivated to join their magnet can be essential for understanding and predicting their success in the program. The purpose of this study was to examine how the type of motivation of magnet students was associated with their perceived learning, academic achievement, and satisfaction. It was hypothesized that students who were intrinsically motivated would have greater perceived learning, academic achievement, and satisfaction than students who were extrinsically motivated due to the potentially harmful effects of extrinsic motivation observed in various studies. Students in the Discovery and Explorations magnet programs at Spring Valley High School were asked to complete a survey to test this hypothesis, and three chi-square tests of independence were conducted to analyze the significance of the data. Results showed that the type of motivation was independent of perceived learning, χ2 (1, N = 90) = 1.56, p = .211, and academic achievement, χ2 (1, N = 82) = 0.09, p = .767. However, type of motivation was significantly correlated with satisfaction, χ2 (1, N = 83) = 4.63, p = .031. These findings suggest that students who are intrinsically motivated to join their magnet programs are more likely to be highly satisfied with their academic experience than extrinsically motivated students are.