Title

Hypersexualization, Violence, and Desensitization

Author(s)

Kylie LathamFollow

School Name

Chapin High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Behavioral Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Previous research has suggested that violent (79%) and overly sexualized games (21%) are the most common types of video games on the market today (Dill, et al.). This paper examines how violent and hypersexualized games affect desensitization in males. Due to these games dominating the video game market, it is important to explore the potential mental/emotional (desensitization) risks of prolonged exposure to these video games. Specifically in males aged 13-18, in a South Carolina High School. Data was collected from 14 randomized homeroom classes (n=73) ensuring data from all ages (13-18). From October 31, 2021 to December 1, 2021, data was collected from the classes via a 3-part Google Form. After all forms were completed, 2 interviews were conducted on January 13, 2022. To examine results comparing violent/ hypersexualized video gameplay and desensitization in males who play them, a chi-square analysis was conducted, then placed into two separate graphs containing the “mean score” (mentioned in results). Both graphs revealed that exposure to these games did not have a significant effect on desensitization rates. However, the interviews contradicted all data collected. The interviews conducted showed that there is in fact a positive correlation between contrast exposure to violent and/or hypersexualized video games and desensitization in males 13-18. Implications of such game-play could negatively affect how males react in real-life scenarios, this is examined in the Form via scenario-based questions. Future research could be conducted to examine how the brain evolves after continuous exposure to these types of video games.

Location

B&E 237

Start Date

4-2-2022 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 9:45 AM

Hypersexualization, Violence, and Desensitization

B&E 237

Previous research has suggested that violent (79%) and overly sexualized games (21%) are the most common types of video games on the market today (Dill, et al.). This paper examines how violent and hypersexualized games affect desensitization in males. Due to these games dominating the video game market, it is important to explore the potential mental/emotional (desensitization) risks of prolonged exposure to these video games. Specifically in males aged 13-18, in a South Carolina High School. Data was collected from 14 randomized homeroom classes (n=73) ensuring data from all ages (13-18). From October 31, 2021 to December 1, 2021, data was collected from the classes via a 3-part Google Form. After all forms were completed, 2 interviews were conducted on January 13, 2022. To examine results comparing violent/ hypersexualized video gameplay and desensitization in males who play them, a chi-square analysis was conducted, then placed into two separate graphs containing the “mean score” (mentioned in results). Both graphs revealed that exposure to these games did not have a significant effect on desensitization rates. However, the interviews contradicted all data collected. The interviews conducted showed that there is in fact a positive correlation between contrast exposure to violent and/or hypersexualized video games and desensitization in males 13-18. Implications of such game-play could negatively affect how males react in real-life scenarios, this is examined in the Form via scenario-based questions. Future research could be conducted to examine how the brain evolves after continuous exposure to these types of video games.