Title

Self-Worth's Affect on Participation in Afterschool Programs

School Name

Chapin High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Behavioral Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Self-worth, a mental factor affecting motivation, has been seen to be especially important to students. There has been extensive research relating to this self-worth within high school students, particularly how the sources of this self-worth come from a self-worth contingency or group. These self-worth contingencies determine what a person may do in order to keep a stable self-worth level. For example, a person whose self-worth is contingent on Virtue would volunteer in order to keep their self-worth level stable. Despite this extensive research, there has not been research on how a high school student’s self-worth can affect their interest in growing their academics further through academic based after school clubs. This research paper aims to target this gap between how self-worth affects academic based club participation. It is hypothesized that there will be a positive correlation between a student’s self-worth and their likelihood to join an academic based club, meaning that it is hypothesized that a student’s self-worth contingency will affect their likelihood of joining an academic based after school club. A survey has been given by random homeroom classes in a South Carolina high school, asking students questions that would help the researcher see if there is any correlation between participation in academic clubs and a student’s self worth. Overall 66 students were surveyed. All 6 self-worth contingencies have students who were within them, and there was a variety of those willing and not willing to participate in academic based afterschool clubs.

Location

B&E 234

Start Date

4-2-2022 10:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 10:00 AM

Self-Worth's Affect on Participation in Afterschool Programs

B&E 234

Self-worth, a mental factor affecting motivation, has been seen to be especially important to students. There has been extensive research relating to this self-worth within high school students, particularly how the sources of this self-worth come from a self-worth contingency or group. These self-worth contingencies determine what a person may do in order to keep a stable self-worth level. For example, a person whose self-worth is contingent on Virtue would volunteer in order to keep their self-worth level stable. Despite this extensive research, there has not been research on how a high school student’s self-worth can affect their interest in growing their academics further through academic based after school clubs. This research paper aims to target this gap between how self-worth affects academic based club participation. It is hypothesized that there will be a positive correlation between a student’s self-worth and their likelihood to join an academic based club, meaning that it is hypothesized that a student’s self-worth contingency will affect their likelihood of joining an academic based after school club. A survey has been given by random homeroom classes in a South Carolina high school, asking students questions that would help the researcher see if there is any correlation between participation in academic clubs and a student’s self worth. Overall 66 students were surveyed. All 6 self-worth contingencies have students who were within them, and there was a variety of those willing and not willing to participate in academic based afterschool clubs.