Title

The Presence of Sulfates in Shampoos on the Frond Growth of Lemna minor

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Sulfates are added to many shampoos to create a false sense of extra cleaning when washing hair. However, the sulfates can have adverse effects on aquatic biota. This research was intended to determine a shampoo that would not cause harm out of 4 popular consumer brands. It was hypothesized that the Head & Shoulders shampoo will cause the least amount of growth in the frond number, or leaf number, in Lemna minor. This is because of the abrasive substances in the product that would not stimulate plant growth. Shampoos are considered as surfactants, which are known to have toxic effects on environments (Fatima et al., 2014). Ten mL of each shampoo was mixed with 9 mL of water to create 10% solutions. The Lemna minor plants were placed in each group, which was each shampoo brand, in a way that there were 15 fronds in each Petri dish. The hypothesis was supported due to the fronds in the Head & Shoulders solutions having the least amount of growth. A one-way ANOVA test showed that there was a significant difference between the means, due to the p-value of <0.001 being less than the alpha value of 0.05. Overall, the research demonstrates how common consumer products, such as shampoos, can impact aquatic environments.

Location

HSS 215

Start Date

4-2-2022 12:00 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 12:00 PM

The Presence of Sulfates in Shampoos on the Frond Growth of Lemna minor

HSS 215

Sulfates are added to many shampoos to create a false sense of extra cleaning when washing hair. However, the sulfates can have adverse effects on aquatic biota. This research was intended to determine a shampoo that would not cause harm out of 4 popular consumer brands. It was hypothesized that the Head & Shoulders shampoo will cause the least amount of growth in the frond number, or leaf number, in Lemna minor. This is because of the abrasive substances in the product that would not stimulate plant growth. Shampoos are considered as surfactants, which are known to have toxic effects on environments (Fatima et al., 2014). Ten mL of each shampoo was mixed with 9 mL of water to create 10% solutions. The Lemna minor plants were placed in each group, which was each shampoo brand, in a way that there were 15 fronds in each Petri dish. The hypothesis was supported due to the fronds in the Head & Shoulders solutions having the least amount of growth. A one-way ANOVA test showed that there was a significant difference between the means, due to the p-value of <0.001 being less than the alpha value of 0.05. Overall, the research demonstrates how common consumer products, such as shampoos, can impact aquatic environments.