Title

The Effect of Climate Change on Mental Health in Teenagers

Author(s)

Adeep SenFollow

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Behavioral Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The effect of climate change on mental health has been observable in cultures and populations deeply rooted in their environments, but is now becoming increasingly visible in the general population as well (Pikhala 2020). The effect of climate change on the mental health of teenagers has not been well observed, previous research has indicated that the media and narratives surrounding climate change can be damaging to both mental health and detrimental to environmental advocacy groups (McKinley 2008). The purpose of the study was to observe negative effects of climate change on the mental health of teenagers, and compare effects to positive climate action taken by participants. It was hypothesized that students who take positive climate action are more negatively affected by climate change, as mental health effects such as anxiety prompt evasive action (Stanley 2021). This study used a likert scale survey asking respondents to rate the degree to which they experience various negative emotions as a result of climate change and evaluate the positive climate action they take. The respondents were sorted into groups of those who believe they help the environment, and those who do not, and the effect of climate change on mental health was compared between the two groups. The 11 participants who take positive climate action (M=-0.5, SD=6.27) compared to the 20 who do not take positive climate action (M=5.636, SD,=5.278) were more negatively affected by climate change t(29)=5.6398, p=2.898.

Location

B&E 235

Start Date

4-2-2022 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 9:45 AM

The Effect of Climate Change on Mental Health in Teenagers

B&E 235

The effect of climate change on mental health has been observable in cultures and populations deeply rooted in their environments, but is now becoming increasingly visible in the general population as well (Pikhala 2020). The effect of climate change on the mental health of teenagers has not been well observed, previous research has indicated that the media and narratives surrounding climate change can be damaging to both mental health and detrimental to environmental advocacy groups (McKinley 2008). The purpose of the study was to observe negative effects of climate change on the mental health of teenagers, and compare effects to positive climate action taken by participants. It was hypothesized that students who take positive climate action are more negatively affected by climate change, as mental health effects such as anxiety prompt evasive action (Stanley 2021). This study used a likert scale survey asking respondents to rate the degree to which they experience various negative emotions as a result of climate change and evaluate the positive climate action they take. The respondents were sorted into groups of those who believe they help the environment, and those who do not, and the effect of climate change on mental health was compared between the two groups. The 11 participants who take positive climate action (M=-0.5, SD=6.27) compared to the 20 who do not take positive climate action (M=5.636, SD,=5.278) were more negatively affected by climate change t(29)=5.6398, p=2.898.