Title

The Effect of Tinospora cordifolia and Amaranthus on The Growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal organism which can cause disease unlike most commensal organisms which neither harm or help the host. Little is known about the prevalence of natural, cost effective, options to inhibit it. Staphylococcus epidermidis has always been a threatening bacteria although antibiotics developed to counter it. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Tinospora cordifolia and Amaranthus could prevent the growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis. It was hypothesized that if an Amaranthus solution and an Tinospora cordifolia solution were applied to the 70 mg: 1ml Tinospora cordifolia solution and the Amaranthus solution of the same ratio were tested against Staphylococcus epidermidis using zones of inhibition disks on mannitol salt agar petri dishes. After incubating for four days, the three groups (Tinospora cordifolia, Amaranthus, and the control) were compared for inhibition. There were no significant differences in bacteria growth for the three groups. Furthermore, there was insufficient evidence to conclude that there is a difference between the two antibiotic plant powders.

Location

ECL 103

Start Date

3-25-2023 11:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 11:15 AM

The Effect of Tinospora cordifolia and Amaranthus on The Growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis

ECL 103

Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal organism which can cause disease unlike most commensal organisms which neither harm or help the host. Little is known about the prevalence of natural, cost effective, options to inhibit it. Staphylococcus epidermidis has always been a threatening bacteria although antibiotics developed to counter it. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Tinospora cordifolia and Amaranthus could prevent the growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis. It was hypothesized that if an Amaranthus solution and an Tinospora cordifolia solution were applied to the 70 mg: 1ml Tinospora cordifolia solution and the Amaranthus solution of the same ratio were tested against Staphylococcus epidermidis using zones of inhibition disks on mannitol salt agar petri dishes. After incubating for four days, the three groups (Tinospora cordifolia, Amaranthus, and the control) were compared for inhibition. There were no significant differences in bacteria growth for the three groups. Furthermore, there was insufficient evidence to conclude that there is a difference between the two antibiotic plant powders.